China Academics at SLU | St. Lawrence University Patti McGill Peterson Center for International and Intercultural Studies

China Academics at SLU

Chinese Studies Minor

St. Lawrence University offers a Chinese Studies minor. Students are required to take six China-related courses, four language courses, and two Asian Studies courses. Two of the four language courses must be taken on campus.

Study on the SLU China semester is strongly encouraged for the minor. All courses taken in the China program count towards our Chinese Studies minor. Take two more Chinese language courses upon your return to campus and you will receive a Chinese Studies minor. More information on the Chinese Studies minor can be found here

Other China-related courses

St. Lawrence University also offers many other courses related to China. It is not just about the language! From Chinese calligraphy to Chinese film and literature, SLU creates a variety of academic opportunities in the classroom and language labs to satisfy your interest in Chinese culture!

AAH-235 Abst Drawing: Uli Other Form (1 Unit)

The principal objective of this course is to expose students to some abstract drawing traditions of the world and, through studio practices structured around these traditions, enable students to explore the potential of abstract drawing as a viable and independent means of expression. Using the Uli drawing/painting tradition of Nigeria as a point of departure, the course covers European calligraphy; Chinese, Japanese and Arabic calligraphy and painting; and the graphic works of modern artists like Paul Klee, Joan Miro, Ben Shahn, Ibrahim el Salahi and Uche Okeke.

Prerequisite: AAH 131. Fulfills the diversity distribution credit. Also offered through African Studies and Global Studies.

Asian Studies
ASIA-101 (CHIN-101) Elementary Chinese I w/Lab (1 Unit)

This is a two-semester sequence providing an introduction to the speaking, reading, writing and oral comprehension of modern Mandarin Chinese. Through this course, students are expected to be able to communicate in Mandarin Chinese on a basic level. Class sessions plus lab. Open to students with no prior study of Chinese.

ASIA-102 (CHIN-102) Elementary Chinese II w/Lab (1 Unit)

This is a two-semester sequence providing an introduction to the speaking, reading, writing and oral comprehension of modern Mandarin Chinese. Through this course, students are expected to be able to communicate in Mandarin Chinese on a basic level. Class sessions plus lab.

ASIA-103 (CHIN-103) Intermediate Chinese I w/Lab (1 Unit)

103,104. Intermediate Chinese. This is a two-semester sequence in intermediate Mandarin Chinese. The course content stresses all the basic language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Emphasis is on active use of students' vocabulary and grammar. The course includes material every week on Chinese geography, history, culture, and society.

ASIA-201 (CHIN-201) Advanced Chinese I (1 Unit)

This is a course in advanced Mandarin Chinese. While continuing to consolidate the foundation which students have built in their intermediate Chinese courses, this course seeks to further develop the student's ability in all four skills of the Chinese language to the point where he or she will be able to communicate effectively with native speakers of the language, and become better prepared to read all varieties of authentic modern-language texts, including newspapers and short stories.

ASIA-202 (CHIN-202) Advanced Chinese II (1 Unit)
ASIA-227 Traditional Chinese Literature (1 Unit)
ASIA-232 (FILM-232) Chin Culture Through Fiction & Film (1 Unit)

This course is designed to introduce the history and culture of China from its earliest beginnings to the late 19th century, covering Chinese institutions, philosophical trends, religions, literature, arts, and special topics such as gender and family, love and friendship, dream and soul, among others. Materials include Confucian and Taoist classics, Buddhist scriptures, literary and artistic works and films, as well as modern scholarly publications. All readings are in English. No knowledge of China or Chinese language is required.

ASIA-234 (FILM-234) Chinese Literature and Film (1 Unit)

This course provides an overview of Chinese literature and film. The first half surveys traditional Chinese literature with a focus on masterpieces in the golden ages of various genres. The second half introduces modern Chinese literature with a focus on film, including representative works by well-known writers Lu Xun and Ba Jin, and famous film directors such as Zhang Yimou, Chen Kaige, Wang Xiaoshuai and others. The aim is to enhance students' interests and skills in reading and analysis of Chinese literature and film and improve students' understanding of the history, society, and culture of China. All works are read in English translation.

ASIA-291 (GOVT-291) SEM: Comparative Politics (1 Unit)

Is the "China Model" sustainable? The China model has emphasized economic development, GDP growth of at least 8% a year, and a strong state hand that defies traditional understandings of how capitalism works. This course examines how far the Chinese Communist Party will continue the China model at the expense of growing environmental harm, rising inequality, and providing requisite social services that go hand in hand with development. This seminar also aims to provide the conceptual and organizational tools necessary for students to appreciate good research and to begin practicing the craft themselves. First two rounds of registration will be restricted to majors.

ASIA-292 (HIST-292) Modern China (1 Unit)

This course covers three revolutions in modern Chinese history: 1) the rise of the Communist Party; 2) the Cultural Revolution of 1966-1976, using memoirs of Chinese who lived through that decade; 3) the "economic revolution" of the 1980s and 1990s in the context of the Pacific Rim region.

ASIA-3002 (FILM-3005, REL-3002) Buddhism Taoism Through Film (1 Unit)

This course examines the essence of Buddhism and Taoism by exploring the rich, colorful, and fascinating religious world in Asian literature and film. Topics include Taoist fairytales, dream adventure, traveling in the netherworld, longevity practice, salvation, retribution, chan/zen, magical arts, as well as religious ideas in film and their relationship with modern society. By taking this course, students will acquire a fundamental knowledge about Buddhism, one of the three major religions in the world, and Taoism, the wide-spreading Chinese philosophy and religion; savor wisdom and mysticism in the east, which are included mainly in the Taoist classics, Chan/Zen Buddhism, and literary works; enjoy the best literary works and films in Asia; acquire useful knowledge about scholarly works; and develop skills of critical thinking and scholarly research.

ASIA-3005 (CLAS-3003, FILM-3008) Diverse Culinary Traditions (1 Unit)

Diverse Culinary Traditions: International Cuisine, Literature, and Film. The term foodways refers to the culinary practices, both historical and popular, of a people. Cuisine plays a defining role in local and national cultures. What and how people eat is an interplay of numerous factors, including landscape, societal, spiritual, artistic, psychological, political, and economic. In this seminar, students will learn about food, and associated traditions in countries where Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish and Swahili are the primary language. Immigrant cultures and changing foodways will be discussed as well. Students will analyze literary texts and films about food and will research foodways in different cultures, will do oral presentations about their research and ultimately will create and present a poster and write a final paper about their findings. Additionally, students will organize a Festival of International Cuisine where they'll cook and share their insights about foodways in a semester end event open to the campus community

This course also offers an optional travel component worth .25 Unit. Selected students will travel to Spain to study in situ its culinary traditions.

ASIA-322 (GOVT-322) Chinese Politics (1 Unit)

This course attempts to understand China from four perspectives: China as China, China as a Communist party state, China as a developing country, and China as a rising power. Through these lenses, the course examines the historical factors that have shaped the contemporary political environment. It also investigates the nuts and bolts of contemporary Chinese institutions and the nature of Chinese Communist Party rule to bring into sharp relief the challenges and opportunities China faces for the future. Finally, it examines China's influence and security concerns within the international community. GOVT105 or GOVT108 strongly recommended but not required.

Biology
BIOL-412 (GS-412, REL-412) Cross-Cultural Healing (1 Unit)

This class uses healing traditions as the lens with which to examine culture. During the semester students will have the opportunity to meet healers from around the world. In a typical semester, presenters include a Traditional Chinese Medical practitioner, an Ayurvedic physician (from India), a shaman from Peru, an exorcist, a native American Healer an allopathic physician, new age healers, a Christian Scientist and others. The course fulfills a diversity requirement. This course cannot be used to fulfill the requirements for the biology major.

Chemistry
CHEM-3001 Chinese Nutrition & Remedies (1 Unit)
CLAS-224 (ENG-224 Caribbean Literature (1 Unit)

A survey of literature by authors from formerly British colonies: Jamaica, Trinidad, St. Lucia, Barbados, St. Kitts and Dominica. The course considers colonial and postcolonial fiction, poetry and non-fiction by writers from various ethnic groups, including people of African, East Indian, Chinese and European descent. Representative authors are Derek Walcott, Jamaica Kincaid, V.S. Naipaul, Jean Rhys, George Lamming, Edgar Mittelholzer, Olive Senior, Erna Brodber and Michelle Cliff. Also offered through Anthropology and Caribbean and Latin American Studies.

History
HIST-232 Cultures of China (1 Unit)

This course is designed to introduce the history and culture of China from its earliest beginnings to the late 19th century, covering Chinese institutions, philosophical trends, religions, literature, arts, and special topics such as gender and family, love and friendship, dream and soul, among others. Materials include Confucian and Taoist classics, Buddhist scriptures, literary and artistic works and films, as well as modern scholarly publications. All readings are in English. No knowledge about China and Chinese language is required

SOC-278 China's Market Transition (1 Unit)

Is the 21st century the Chinese century? Since the adoption of the reform and opening-up policy in 1979, China has embarked on a path of miraculous economic growth. Although still declared a socialist country, China is increasingly influenced by market and global capitalism, and Chinese society has changed in profound ways. This course focuses on China's transformation from a planned economy to a more market-oriented economy and examines changes in the social fabrics in tandem with its economic transition, such as the role of private entrepreneurs and social networks, and the effect of the reforms on culture, social classes, genders, and ethnic minorities.

SOC-283 Issues in Chinese Society (0.83 Unit)