CBL Courses | St. Lawrence University Community Based Learning

CBL Courses

Community Based Learning offers CBL 100 (fall semester) and CBL 101 (spring semester).

CBL also offers students the opportunity to apply for a CBL Independent Study. In order to apply, a student must have a faculty sponsor and must complete the following paperwork the semester before the intended experience.

CBL supports a number of courses from academic departments as listed below.

HOW TO SEARCH FOR CBL COURSES in APR

  1. First, make sure the SUBJECTS filter is completely cleared
  2. Select the correct semester/year under the TERMS filter
  3. Under the COURSE LEVEL filter, select Community Based Learning
  4. It is also helpful to select open sections under the AVAILABLITY filter

Spring 2020 Courses

AFAM-264CBL Afr Amer Hist 1865-PRESENT (1 Credits)
Permission only. Course is taught off campus at the Riverview Correctional Facility in Ogdensburg. A survey of the social, political, cultural and economic history of African-Americans from 1865 to the present day. Topics include Reconstruction, the implementation of segregation, the Harlem Renaissance, African-Americans'participation in both World Wars and Vietnam, the civil rights movement,the black power movement and activism in the 1980s and 1990s.Fulfills HU Distribution (2013 curriculum). Fulfills DIV13 Distribution (2013 curriculum). Requisites: None. Also listed as HIST-264CBL.

ANTH-244SPK ChldhdAcroCult'r w/CBL&SPK (1 Credits)
This course includes an experiential learning component known as Community Based Learning (CBL) and also is Speaking Intensive . The CBL component will require students to participate in a community placement, outside of class time, on a weekly basis throughout the semester. On average students can expect to spend at least two hours per week in the community. Are children angelic blank slates, demonic nuisances, or a cheap source of labor? Do humans have an "instinct" to adore and care for children? Do children everywhere go through the same developmental stages? When does childhood begin and end? How should caregivers speak to a child? When and how is it appropriate for children to behave as sexual beings? Different cultures and historical periods exhibit a range of ways of imagining and enacting the early stages of human life. In this class, we will treat this diversity as a vast experimental laboratory for understanding the malleability of the human condition. By examining case studies of childhood across a variety of cultures and gaining first-hand experience with children living in the North Country, we will explore the question of what is natural and what is cultural about our ideas of childhood. Requisites: None

BIOL-305CBL Health Coaches II w/CBL (0.5 Credits)
During the spring semester of Health Coaches, students are assigned a chronically ill individual to visit, call and assist with setting and achieving health goals. After the initial patient visit and introduction by a healthcare professional, students spend 1-2 hours a week alone with their patient, talking about and implementing changes that will benefit their health. Every other class period is dedicated to clinical conferences, where students present their patients' health challenges and current goals. Other professionals on the healthcare team will be present to share ideas that have worked with previous patients and offer support. Pre-req: BIOL-304 or BIOL-304CBL

CBL-100 Community Based Learning (0.5 Credits)
CBL 100 is a .5 unit class that introduces students to the notion of civic engagement. We'll focus on what it means to be an engaged member of a community, why it matters, and what obligations we might have to make the world, from the local community outward, a better place. And what more productive way to learn about that than actually to engage in the community? Students in CBL 100 can expect to complement class readings and discussions of civic engagement through community placements requiring 2-3 hours per week throughout the semester. Community placements might include schools, farms, our county correctional facility, local agencies that serve community needs, work with the elderly, local meal programs, and more. Requisites:None.

FRPG-2055CBL What'sGreatAboutOutrEd w/CBL (1.5 Credits)
In this FYS students are expected to engage in non-traditional classroom exercises, many of which will take place outside during the winter months. The term Outdoor Education (OE) has been applied to a wide range of programs including international service learning expeditions, white water rafting trips, high ropes course sessions, and geology field trips, among others. Advertising pamphlets are littered with terms like character building, leadership, and environmental stewardship. A perceptive critic, however, might wonder: how does an environmental steward reconcile the carbon footprint of transporting their class great distances; does cheering-on a peer to climb higher instill confidence or just strengthen the imperative to listen to peer-pressure; or, what does taking students outside offer that the classroom does not? This class will give students first-hand experience with current OE practices, and current practices in more traditional education through volunteering in local schools. These first-hand experiences will bring relevance to the current literature critiquing the strengths and issues with OE. This FYS is equivalent to a 100 level Outdoor Studies course and fulfills the FYS and HU general education requirements. This course includes an experiential learning component known as Community Based Learning (CBL). The CBL component will require students to participate in a community placement, outside of class time, on a weekly basis throughout the semester. On average students can expect to spend at least two hours per week in the community. Requisites: None.

FRPG-2111CBL Commercial Sport w/CBL (1.5 Credits)
How Commercial Sport is Both the Destroyer and Redeemer of Our Communities: The Phoenix Effect [CBL] Marianna Locke Tuesday and Thursday 10:10 a.m.-12:20 p.m. Class size: 16 For-profit corporations have standardized and administered modern sport, leisure, and recreation as a commodity. Consequently, division exists between the emancipatory potential of sport-its capacity to revitalize a community-and its function as a product for social consumption-its capacity to financially enrich investors. This dichotomy further complicates the relationship between commercial sport and recreation enterprises and communities. Does commercial sport have the potential to renew itself-like the mythical legend of the Phoenix, to rise from its ashes into a new form of life? This seminar will challenge students to move beyond dialogue and to produce concrete solutions to this question. And in so doing, this course will continue to cultivate your critical thinking, writing, and communication skills as well as introduce students to developing research competencies. This course fulfills the FYS and SS general education requirements. This course includes an experiential learning component known as Community Based Learning (CBL). The CBL component will require students to participate in a community placement, outside of class time, on a weekly basis throughout the semester. On average students can expect to spend at least two hours per week in the community. Requisites: None.

PHIL-100CBL Intro to Philosophy w/CBL (1 Credits)
PERMISSION ONLY COURSE-OFF CAMPUS AT RIVERVIEW CORRECTIONAL FACILITY A non-historical survey that approaches the field through consideration of such perennial problems as ultimate reality, free will, knowledge, morality, political obligation and the existence of God. This course is open to students without previous work in philosophy. Fulfills HU Distribution (2013 curriculum). Requisites: None.

PHIL-354 Biomedical Ethics w/CBL (1 Credits)
The term "bioethics" first emerged in the 1970s This course gives students the theoretical and conceptual tools necessary for sophisticated reflection on contemporary ethical issues affecting medicine at large, and better prepares those pursuing a career in medicine for its ethical demands. Students are introduced to a wide array of philosophical approaches to medical ethics as well as to a varied selection of concrete ethical issues in the medical field. Through a community-based learning component, this course also gives students insight into some of the specific health needs and challenges in the North Country. The Community-Based Learning component further enhances reflection on the difference between ethical thinking in theory and in practice, and promotes understanding of the role that contextual, situated, and experiential knowledge plays in making astute ethical judgments.Counts toward the public health minor. Requisites: Pre-req: one PHIL course - Must be completed prior to taking this course.

SOC-233CBL Consuming Food w/CBL (1 Credits)
This course examines the social relations surrounding the production, distribution, and consumption of food. How do gender, class, race, and ethnicity influence what we eat? How do social institutions, especially policies related to food and agriculture, market structures, and social movements affect the way our food is produced and consumed? In this class, we will discuss changes occurring in how food is produced, processed, sold, and regulated; how these changes are related to health disparities and unequal access to health and affordable food; the relationships between food, identity, race, ethnicity, and class; and the potential for alternative food movements (e.g. organic, local) to fundamentally alter these dynamics. This course includes an experiential learning component known as Community Based Learning (CBL). The CBL component will require students to participate in a community placement, outside of class time, on a weekly basis throughout the semester; on average students can expect to spend up to/at least two hours per week in the community. Fulfills SS distribution and DIV requirement ( 2013 curriculum). Requisites: None.

 

Fall 2019 Courses

First Year Program Courses (with CBL components)

FRPG-1006CBL Campbell College:Peace Begins with Me
Instructor: Donna Alvah/Brenda Papineau

FRPG-1012 Eaton College:Reading, Writing, Prison: Essays and Discussion on Corrections Today
Instructor:Pamela Thacher

FRPG-1017CBL Green College:Health Activism: Fighting for a Healthier Future
Instructor: Rosa WIlliams

FRPG-1025CBL Reiff College:Impactful Leadership: Theory and Practice
Instructor: Mirianna Locke/Elisa VanKirk

FRPG-1038CBL MacAllaster College:Your Place in the World: What it Means to Be Local
Instructor: Josh Exoo/Rebecca Jewell 

FRPG-1052CBL Van de Water College:Rural Dreams: Surveying the Plight and Promise of America’s Small Towns
Instructor: Matt Burnett/Geroge Repicky

FRPG-1059CBL Bacheller College:Children's Literature and its Life-Long Lessons: from Wonderland to Diagon Alley
Instructor: Karen Gibson

General Courses

BIOL-304CBL: Health Coaches I
Instructor: Jane Kring

CBL-3026:IntroSoc:Civic Engage w/CBL
Instructor: Marianna Locke
*also listed as SOC-3105

ENG-222CBL LS: Multi-Ethnic Ame Lit /CBL
Instructor: Penny Vlagopoulos
*Permission of Instructor/course to be held at Riverview Correctional Facility

ENG-293SUST CW: Literary Harvest w/CBL
Instructor: Natalia Singer
*cross-listed as Global Studies 293SUST and ENVS 293SUST

PSYC 413: Community Psychology
Instructor: Cathy Crosby
*Permission of Instructor