DO! Connect with Campus Courses.

Professors teaching and/or research expertise for creating affinity groups and helping students to identify themes and faculty for their SYEs (Senior Year Experiences), themes for the Integrative Learning Component (ILC) requirement, and/or information on specific topics:

African Studies

  • Erika BarthelmessBiology: (1) Conservation Biology; mammalian ecology and conservation; (2) Wildlife conservation in Africa; (3) Interdisciplinary science communication and environmental education.

  • Bob Blewett, Economics: (1) Economic Development; (2) Minority Middleman/Supply Chain Networks; (3) Impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on economic development and growth.

  • Eloise Brezault, Modern Languages and Literatures(1) Representation of African diaspora in France through literature, art and films. How literature and films deals with immigration in France from Subsaharan Africa. Representation of Africa and African in contemporary African novels; (2) Memorialization in the post-genocide Rwanda through art and literature. Process of memorialization in the Congo DRC through contemporary fiction and films; (3) Literary field of African Francophone novels in the French publishing industry, book market, postcolonial publishing industry.

  • Matt CarotenutoHistoryAfrican History, African Studies, Kenya, Ethnicity, Gender, Identity politics, Sport history. 

  • Wendi Haugh, Anthropology(1) Nationalism, cosmopolitanism, political identities; (2) Environmental anthropology, human-animal relations, bird guides; (3) Social movements, sociocultural change.

  • Erik JohnsonPerformance & Communication ArtsGlobal Media, African Popular Culture, African Independence Movements, Postcolonial Theory, Pan-Africanism, Ghana, New Orleans

  • Kristin McKie, Government(1) Rule of law, constitution-making, political institutions; (2) African politics; (3) Foreign Aid.

African-American Studies

Anthropology

  • Adam Harr, Anthropology(1) My primary teaching and research area is sociolinguistics: the relationship between language and sociocultural categories. In the past, I have advised students doing projects on the revitalization of a dying language in U.S Jewish community centers; documenting a previously undescribed Spanish-based creole language in Peru; language in bartering in India and the changing language of democratic politics in Kenya; (2) My primary research methods are ethnographic: participant-observation, semi-structured interviews, film-making, and discourse analysis. I would be happy to advise students contemplating an ethnographic project; (3) Much of my research has focused on religion practices. My primary focus has been ancestor veneration, but my research is moving into the anthropology of Islam in Indonesia.

  • Wendi Haugh, Anthropology(1) Nationalism, cosmopolitanism, political identities; (2) Environmental anthropology, human-animal relations, bird guides; (3) Social movements, sociocultural change.

  • Mindy PitreAnthropology(1) "Ancient Public Health". I teach courses related to health, disease, and lifestyle in the past. Through analyzing human bone and the things people leave behind we can better understand the lived experience in the past; (2) "Evolution/adaptation". I teach courses related to the evolution of the human species and our closest living relatives the non human primates. Specifically in my courses we look at the evolution of the primate order over the past 65 million years, focusing on biology, behavior, environment, and adaption; (3) "Forensics". I teach courses related to forensics including Human Osteology and Forensic Anthropology. Specifically I focus on how the human skeleton can be used to determine aspects of an individual's identity including sex, age, genetic ancestry, and height. In addition, I teach students how to use bone etc. to determine cause, manner, and postmortem interval to solve criminal cases.

Art & Art History

Asian Studies

  • Jayantha Jayman, Global StudiesCapitalism, nationalism, socialism, communism; class, gender, race, sexuality; firms, states, social movements, non-state actors, NGOs; environment, fisheries, sustainable agriculture; ASEAN, SAARC. 

  • David Henderson, MusicMedia and technology, identity and difference, performance and expressive culture

  • Erin McCarthyPhilosophy: (1) Feminist philosophy east and west; (2) Asian Philosophy; (3) French philosophy.

  • Mark MacWilliams, Religious StudiesBuddhism in East Asia, Religion and nationalism, religion and popular culture, East Asian religion and the Arts,  religion and new religious movements,  East asian religion and politics, spirituality, meditation and East Asia, pilgrimage, tourism and religion in East Asia

  • Aswini PaiBiology(1) Plant Ecology, Medicinal Plants, Ethnobotany (NE USA and Asia); (2) Pollinators (Bees and Syrphids) (NE USA and India); (3) Tropical Ecology (Asia).

  • Zhenjun ZhangModern Languages and Literatures: (1) Chinese language and translation; (2) Chinese literature and film; (3) Chinese religions and culture.

  • Chandreyi BasuArt & Art History(1) Religious identities and interactions; (2) Gender identities; (3) Arts, architecture, media.

Biology

  • Robert Haney, Biology: (1) Genomics/transcriptomics/bioinformatics; (2) Evolutionary Biology/Population genetics; (3) Spiders & freshwater invertebrates;

  • Linda Auker, Biology(1) Invasive species. I teach an upper level course called Invasive Species which is currently a special topics offering (Biol 3048). My research directly deals with the impact and distribution of invasive species. I am interested in individual, population, and community-level impacts on native species; (2) Physiology of invertebrates. One aspect of my research focuses on the impact of overgrowth by one species on the physiology (including heart rate and scope for growth) on native aquatic invertebrates. My focus organism at the moment are marine mussels. In addition to this, I am also interested in studying the reproduction and life cycles of both mussels and ascidians (the latter are my model invasive species organisms); (3) Using R (and RStudio) for analyzing ecological data. Along with Erika Barthelmess, I've been working with research students on using R to do statistical and graphical analysis of data. We find this skill is necessary for those students who want to proceed to graduate school and/or positions in ecology. I require my SYE students to use R to analyze and display their results and, in doing so, this helps them overcome the initial learning curve of using this extremely powerful and useful programming language.

  • Erika BarthelmessBiology: (1) Conservation Biology; mammalian ecology and conservation; (2) Wildlife conservation in Africa; (3) Interdisciplinary science communication and environmental education.

  • Emily Dixon, Biology(1) My research focuses on how yeast respond to the lack (or perceived lack) of nutrients. This involves studying gene regulation in response to nutrient stress. Related to this, in some of my courses students learn how nutrients are used and made in our bodies; (2) Biochemistry. This is the chemical reactions that take place in living organisms; (3) Molecular biology. This is manipulating DNA in test tubes in order to determine the function of particular DNA/protein sequences.

  • Joe ErlichmanBiology: (1) Neuroscience: brain function; (2) Physiology: interrelationships between organ systems; (3) Nanoscience: Interface between physiology and nanotechnology (things smaller than 100 nm)

  • Jane Kring, Biology(1)Human Anatomy & Physiology - The relationship between how the human body is put together and how it works; (2) Human Pathophysiology - How disease causes alterations in normal physiological functions and therefore symptoms and decreased wellness; (3)Communication Skills especially as they relate to Healthcare - What are the important skills that allow a healthcare provider and patient to connect and have a therapeutic relationship? How is motivational interviewing different from a typical patient/physician encounter?

  • Aswini PaiBiology; (1) Plant Ecology, Medicinal Plants, Ethnobotany (NE USA and Asia); (2) Pollinators (Bees and Syrphids) (NE USA and India); (3) Tropical Ecology (Asia).

  • Alex Schreiber, Biology(1) Teaching during the Fall and Spring semesters: Physiological adaptation and acclimation of animals and humans to extreme environments, such as altitude, cold, heat, salinity, and aridity; (2) Summer courses: 1) BioExpedition Kenya: The physiological ecology and conservation biology of East African animals. 2) Himalayan Odyssey: human physiological acclimation and adaptation to high altitude in Nepal; (3) Research: Effects of hormone-disrupting environmental pollutants on immune development and metamorphosis of amphibians.

Canadian Studies

Caribbean, Latin American and Latino Studies

Chemistry

  • Nadia Marano, Chemistry: (1) In my research, I study amyloid proteins, which are a particular fibrous, stable protein structure. While this type of structure can be associated with certain human neurological diseases, it can also be functional. Specifically, My current research focuses on the amyloid proteins that form part of bacterial biofilms. (2) One area of teaching is biochemistry - the chemical structures and reactions in living organisms. I have been teaching the advanced course that focuses on metabolism, generally with a focus on humans since this is most interesting to students. (3) I teach general chemistry, the introductory chemistry course.

  • Emily Dixon, Biology(1) My research focuses on how yeast respond to the lack (or perceived lack) of nutrients. This involves studying gene regulation in response to nutrient stress. Related to this, in some of my courses students learn how nutrients are used and made in our bodies; (2) Biochemistry. This is the chemical reactions that take place in living organisms; (3) Molecular biology. This is manipulating DNA in test tubes in order to determine the function of particular DNA/protein sequences.

  • Samantha Glazier, Chemistry; (1) I use thermodynamics and kinetics to study the role of water in binding between anti cancers drugs and DNA; (2) Periodically, I work with students interested in teaching to develop new science and society courses to teach at local prisons as part of the Inside Out Prison Exchange curriculum; (3) I teach general chemistry and upper division physical chemistry courses. 

  • Adam HillChemistry: (1) Physical chemistry/quantum mechanics; (2) Inorganic chemistry/transition metals; (3) Renewable energy/solar fuels

  • Samuel Tartakoff, Chemistry: (1) Organic synthesis: making interesting, complex small molecules from simple, readily available starting materials. This research has application in the development of new pharmaceuticals and novel materials, like plastics and protective coatings. Specifically, I have been looking at trying to make synthetic opioids (morphine-like molecules); (2) Methods development: for organic chemists to make new molecules, they need to have access to a variety of chemical reactions. I work on developing new chemical reactions and seek to understand the limitations and mechanisms of those reactions; (3) Synthesis on demand: because organic molecules are used in a variety of fields, other research projects sometimes require molecules that are not readily available from commercial sources. In collaboration with other professors, I have synthesized molecules for studying artificial photosynthesis and for looking at interactions between DNA and chemotherapeutics.

Diversity and Inclusion

Economics:

  • Cynthia Bansak, Economics: (1) Economics of Immigration; (2) Labor Economics; (3) Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve System of the US.

  • Bob Blewett, Economics: (1) Economic Development; (2) Minority Middleman/Supply Chain Networks; (3) Impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on economic development and growth.

  • Alison Del Rossi, Economics: (1) Returns to education. I look at human capital investment (especially higher education degrees) to see what are the economic (income increases) and other benefits of different degrees. Recent work is concerned with gender differences in returns and choices; (2) Risky behavior, especially smoking. I teach and research issues about risky choices and government regulation/taxation of such behavior with a focus on smoking/tobacco use; (3) broader teaching areas are labor economics, economics of gender, public finance, law and economics.

  • Jeffrey Young, Economics: (1) History of Economic Thought; (2) Natural Resource Economics; (3) Moral philosophy and Economics. 

Education

  • Jeff Frank, Education: (1) Philosophy of Education; (2) African American Social and Educational Thought; (3) Philosophy of Literature

  • Jessica Sierk, Education: (1) I am a Critical Whiteness Studies (CWS) scholar and will be teaching a course on CWS in Education (EDUC 3027) during Fall 2017 (and then every other fall in the coming years). Critical Whiteness Studies looks at the ways in which white supremacy influences our society. As an offshoot of Critical Race Theory (CRT), it looks at the ways in which racism is endemic to our society. My course will take an intersectional approach to looking at how race, ethnicity, language, religion, nationality, class, and gender are all influenced by and influence white supremacy in the realm of education; (2) My dissertation research looked at how the New Latino Diaspora (locations in the United States that do not have a historic Latino presence, but now have substantial Latino populations) influenced students' (both Latino and white) social identities. It looked at how students co-constructed racial, ethnic, and linguistic identities for themselves and their peers and how they negotiated this boundaries as they transitioned from high school to post-secondary opportunities; (3) In my teaching (especially in EDUC 203 - Contemporary Issues in American Education) I like to incorporate media representations of the topics covered (e.g., sex education, school violence, LGBT inclusion, etc.). In the next iteration of the course, I will be having students write editorials instead of reflection papers. I like to take learning public, displaying student work on campus whenever I get the chance!

English

  • Caroline BreashearsEnglish(1) Jane Austen: Although Austen died two hundred years ago, her novels remain popular. My courses explore the historically specific meanings of her novels as well as the timeless messages that enable them to be adapted in novels, films, and games. My most recent course also examines how readers immerse themselves in her world and how sites associated with Austen (like Bath) have capitalized on that association; (2) Eighteenth-Century British Literature: The eighteenth century was an era of great social, economic, and literary development. My courses examine the birth of new forms, such as the periodical paper and the novel, and their legacy today. My research focuses on the development of the subgenre of the "scandalous memoir" and its economic, social, and political significance; (3) Fairy Tales: This genre is often dismissed as propagating unrealistic fantasies to children. My courses examine the long history of this genre, its evolution across cultures, and its messages of persistence--messages designed for adults as well as children. Far from simplistic stories, fairy tales provide ways for cultures to ponder universal problems (mate selection, for instance) and to resist oppression (as in trickster tales).

  • Sarah Gates, English: (1) Victorian literature, especially the works of Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, and Anthony Trollope; (2) Fantasy literature, especially the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, (3) Intertextuality: the study of purposes and effects of allusions to, adaptations of, and general incorporations of literary and popular works into a work of literature.

  • Paul GrahamEnglish: (1) Fiction Writing: Short fiction, novellas, long-form fiction (novels), and literary fiction; (2) Literary Nonfiction: memoir, personal essay, and long-form nonfiction; (3) Food writing, studies in the American "foodscape" (production, consumption, sourcing, distribution, and food-justice), cooking, and agriculture.

  • Alvin Henry, English: (1) African American literature and culture, Critical Race Theory: (2) Queer Theory, Youth Culture; (3) Disability Studies, Ethnography

  • Juraj KittlerPCA: (1) Historical Urban Geography - Venice (c. 1400-1530): My primary specialization is in the development of the public sphere - i.e., political culture, economic networks, social structures, the symbolic role of the arts & architecture - of the late medieval and Renaissance urban centers in Italy, mainly Venice; (2) Historical Urban Geography - London (1680-1730): My secondary specialization is in the development of the public sphere - i.e., political culture, economic networks, social structures, the symbolic role of the arts & architecture - of the early modern London during the period described by Jurgen Habermas as the golden age of London coffeehouses; (3) Comparative Media Systems: I have a vast experience in comparing media systems - I am interested in the ways in which the same communication technology has been historically implemented in slightly different ways by various societies, reflecting their core socio-cultural values.

  • Pedro PonceEnglish(1) My primary teaching and research area is creative writing. I teach introductory and advanced fiction writing, as well as the research methods and writing course for English majors. My publications are primarily in short fiction, but I also write book reviews and critical essays on contemporary literature. (2) Paranoia and conspiracy theory, mainly growing out of American culture after World War II. Some of my critical work grows out of this area. I've taught conspiracy theory in the English Department as well as in the FYP. My current research in this area looks at the motif of women investigator characters in popular culture; (3) The cultural status of fact versus fiction throughout history. This interest is still evolving; I'm not sure if I will pursue it as a critic or a fiction writer, but I think the dwindling distinction between the virtual and the real will continue to be urgently important in this first century of the digital age.

  • Natalia Singer, English(1) I teach and write the literary essay. In my creative nonfiction courses at the intro and advanced level and in special topics courses I introduce students to the memoir, the personal essay, travel essay, nature essay, literary journalism, political essay, and more; (2) I haven't taught fiction much lately, but that's my special training: the short story. I write and have published fiction; (3) I teach courses that are cross-listed with environmental studies and global studies: literature of the environment, a literary harvest (a CBL course that focuses on SLC hunger and food justice issues, and sustainable agriculture). I have taught place-based writing on the ADK semester and in France and India.

  • Mark Sturges, English: (1) American literature: I teach a wide range of courses in American literature. My scholarship focuses mainly on early American literature from the colonial era to the U.S. Civil War; (2) Environmental literature: I teach a variety of courses about environmental literature that highlight such themes as wilderness preservation, agricultural labor, animal rights, climate change, and sustainability; (3) Place-based literature: I have a special interest in Adirondack literature and the literature of Cape Cod. My courses about these topics survey a range of regional writing and often incorporate travel components to "ground-truth" our study of cultural geography.

  • Penny Vlagopoulos, English: (1) Modern and Contemporary American Literature and Culture; Emphasis on Race, Gender, and Sexuality; (2) Multi-Ethnic/Global Literatures and Cultures; Globalization and Cosmopolitanism; Migration and Diaspora; Border Studies; (3) The Beat Generation; Underground Cultures; Protest Art.

Environmental Studies

  • Sara AshpoleEnvironmental Studies(1) Wildlife conservation: The protection and restoration of habitats and species, including mitigating threats (e.g. road ecology, eco-toxicology, vertebrate invasive species). Amphibian and reptile biology, ecology, and management. Local, regional, national, North American transboundary (Canada/USA/Mexico) and global (IUCN - Amphibian Survival Group) conservation. Research projects in British Columbia, Great Lakes, Canton Area, & China. Travel with students to British Colombia, China, Costa Rica, Florida Everglades (S'18); (2)  Conservation Planning: Landscape level conservation on private and protected lands with multi-stakeholders (Non-government organizations, Government organizations at all levels, first nations, industry, agricultural lands). Examining the interaction between habitats, species, and people. Research projects in British Columbia, Great Lakes, Canton Area, & China. Travel with students to British Colombia and China; (3) Sustainable Resource Use & Complex Ecological Systems

  • Carrie JohnsEnvironmental Studies:  (1) Environmental impacts of agriculture including water use and quality, soil fertility and erosion, livestock care and impacts of CAFOs. Regenerative agricultural techniques, low-input agriculture,adaptations to climate change and climate variability, small-scale vs large scale agriculture. Sustainable agriculture. Farmworkers in the U.S. (2) Water quality - sources and types of pollution, ecological impacts of pollutants (species, populations, communities, nutrient cycling, toxicology), sewage treatment, dealing with nutrient run-off. Rainwater harvesting and gardens for treatment; (3) Air quality - types and sources of air pollutants, human health impacts of mainstream pollutants like ozone and particulate matter, airborne fluoride impacts on cattle. Climate change - impacts, predictions, greenhouse gas sources.

European Studies

  • Caroline Breashears, English(1) Jane Austen: Although Austen died two hundred years ago, her novels remain popular. My courses explore the historically specific meanings of her novels as well as the timeless messages that enable them to be adapted in novels, films, and games. My most recent course also examines how readers immerse themselves in her world and how sites associated with Austen (like Bath) have capitalized on that association; (2) Eighteenth-Century British Literature: The eighteenth century was an era of great social, economic, and literary development. My courses examine the birth of new forms, such as the periodical paper and the novel, and their legacy today. My research focuses on the development of the subgenre of the "scandalous memoir" and its economic, social, and political significance; (3) Fairy Tales: This genre is often dismissed as propagating unrealistic fantasies to children. My courses examine the long history of this genre, its evolution across cultures, and its messages of persistence--messages designed for adults as well as children. Far from simplistic stories, fairy tales provide ways for cultures to ponder universal problems (mate selection, for instance) and to resist oppression (as in trickster tales).

  • Christopher BuckGovernment(1) Political theory; (2) Environmental politics; (3) Peace studies.

  • Mark DenaciArt & Art History

  • Judith DeGroatHistory(1) France, Europe: 18th century-present. Gender, intercultural, cultural, social history. Colonialism, imperialism, labor, transnational encounters/exchanges feminism., film Digital humanities; (2) Senegal/West Africa: 19th century-present. Gender, intercultural, cultural, social history. Colonialism, imperialism, labor, transnational encounters/exchanges, feminism, film. Digital humanities; (3) Local/Public History: 19th century-present. Collection of histories, development and sharing of archives (both analog and digital), digital story-telling, oral history. Gender, feminism, about labor.

  • Elun GabrielHistoryPolitical culture, Political violence, Political radicalism, Genocide, Revolution, Utopianism, Prison, Germany

  • Michael JenkinsEconomics

  • Dorothy LimouzeArt & Art History

  • Marcella SalviModern Languages

First year Studies

  • Josh ExooFirst year Studies: (1) Poetry in English; (2) Buddhist Philosophy and Practice; (3) Media Studies

  • Robert Selby, First year Studies: (1) Visual Art: specifically, drawing and painting with a pertinent sub set that includes anatomy, perspective and color theory; (2) Visual Art: Comic art and illustration; (3) Communication.

Global Studies Department

  • Madeleine WongGlobal Studies

  • John CollinsGlobal StudiesGlobal studies, cultural studies, discourse analysis, Palestine and the Palestinian liberation struggle, settler colonialism, anti-colonialism, nationalism, global politics of violence, media studies, citizen journalism, social memory, ethnography, global solidarity movements (1) Settler colonialism and decolonization, (2) Critical media literacy and citizen journalism; (3) Social movements, activism, and solidarity.

  • Eve StoddardGlobal StudiesGlobal studies including cultural studies, feminism, postcolonial studies, Irish Studies, Caribbean studies, race and ethnic identities, cosmopolitanism, postcolonial literatures, English Romantic literature and the environment

  • Jayantha JaymanGlobal StudiesCapitalism, nationalism, socialism, communism; class, gender, race, sexuality; firms, states, social movements, non-state actors, NGOs; environment, fisheries, sustainable agriculture; ASEAN, SAARC, NATO, EU

Gender & Sexuality Studies

  • Jennifer MacGregor, Gender & Sexuality Studies: (1) Gender, Sexuality, Race, Social Class (2) Humans and Technology (esp Computer-Mediated Communication); Adolescent Social Development vis à vis digital communication (3) Popular Culture

  • Valerie LehrGender & Sexuality Studies: (1) LGBT Politics and social movements -- Though my own research has generally focused on the United States, I have some familiarity with comparative work, and would be happy to learn more by working with students; (2) Feminist Politics and Theory -- My own work has again focused on the US, though I have taught about feminism is other countries and taught a course on feminism in Britain; (3) The Politics of Family -- I have taught about and done research in this area. I am most interested in the connections to feminism, including ways that family is used as a tool in backlash movements.

Geology

  • Judith Nagel-Myers, Geology: (1) Paleobiology, exploring ancient organisms and their relationship to their environment. My research areas span from North America to Europe, but research material can be sampled on most continents; (2) Predator-prey interactions in the fossil record. I am studying organism interactions and what these can tell us about the state of the ecosystems they lives in. Most recent studies include samples from Germany, Vienna, Florida and Seymour Island (Antarctica); (3) I research the structural properties of marine invertebrate and how these represent evolutionary adaptations to abiotic and biotic conditions.

Government

  • Chris BuckGovernment(1) Political theory; (2) Environmental politics; (3) Peace studies.

  • Grace HuangGovernment; (1) Chinese Politics; (2) Asian Politics; (3) Comparative Politics

  • Kristin McKie, Government(1) Rule of law, constitution-making, political institutions; (2) African politics; (3) Foreign Aid.

  • Valerie LehrGovernment: (1) LGBT Politics and social movements -- Though my own research has generally focused on the United States, I have some familiarity with comparative work, and would be happy to learn more by working with students; (2) Feminist Politics and Theory -- My own work has again focused on the US, though I have taught about feminism is other countries and taught a course on feminism in Britain; (3) The Politics of Family -- I have taught about and done research in this area. I am most interested in the connections to feminism, including ways that family is used as a tool in backlash movements.

  • Ronnie Olesker, Government: (1) International relations; (2) Middle East Politics, (3) Social identities and security studies.

History

  • Donna Alvah, History: (1) US foreign relations past and present, broadly conceived--including social and cultural aspects of US foreign relations (e.g., Americans' perceptions of and responses to US foreign relations; effects of US foreign relations on people in other countries, and their responses; Americans abroad; immigration);  (2) The Cold War, including US foreign relations (encompassing Korean and Vietnam Wars), domestic politics, social and cultural dimensions; (3) History of children and youth, including ideas about childhood as well as experiences and perspectives of children and youth; (4) Peace Studies, including nonviolent movements for social justice and antiwar/anti-militarism activism

  • Judith De Groat, History(1) France, Europe: 18th century-present. Gender, intercultural, cultural, social history. Colonialism, imperialism, labor, transnational encounters/exchanges feminism., film Digital humanities; (2) Senegal/West Africa: 19th century-present. Gender, intercultural, cultural, social history. Colonialism, imperialism, labor, transnational encounters/exchanges, feminism, film. Digital humanities; (3) Local/Public History: 19th century-present. Collection of histories, development and sharing of archives (both analog and digital), digital story-telling, oral history. Gender, feminism, about labor.

  • Howard EissenstatHistory (1) Middle Eastern History and Politics; (2) Human Rights and Policy; (3) Political Islam

Mathematics, Computer Science & Statistics

  • Patti Frazer LockMathematics, Computer Science & Statistics: (1) Network Theory. The study of how objects connect and interact. This has applications in neuroscience, social networks, transportation networks, communications networks, and many more areas; (2) Applied Statistics. Using data analysis to make sense of information; (3) Mathematics and Statistics Education. Investigating methods to improve student understanding and enjoyment of mathematics and statistics at all levels.

  • Daniel LookMathematics, Computer Science & Statistics: (1) Stylometry: This is the application of statistical techniques to the written language. My application primarily deals with authorship attribution. Classical techniques can used in tandem with using statistics to determine words usage patterns among authors; (2) Complex Dynamics: This topic deals with the behavior of the complex plane under iteration of a function; (3) Mathematics in Popular Culture: I have an interest in the uses and representations of mathematics and mathematicians in popular culture, specifically in pulp magazines published in the early part of the 20th century.

Modern Languages and Literatures

  • Eloise Brezault, Modern Languages and Literatures: (1) French and Francophone cultures (Western and Central Africa, the Caribbean): colonisation, postcolonial studies, immigration in France, stereotypes and representations of black people in France, identity, African literature; (2) French language; (3) Memory studies in Africa: Rwanda genocide, civil wars in Africa.

  • Marcella Salvi, Modern Languages and Literatures: (1) Hispanic Studies: language, literature, culture; Spanish Golden Age theatre (16th and 17th centuries). (2) Italian Studies: language, literature, culture; Renaissance and Baroque theatre (16th and 17th centuries). (3) Contemporary literature in Spain and Italy (poetry, prose, and drama). Politics of memory in contemporary Spanish and Italian literature; women writers; cultural and interdisciplinary studies; socio-historical approaches; gender studies.

  • Eloise Brezault, Modern Languages and Literatures(1) Representation of African diaspora in France through literature, art and films. How literature and films deals with immigration in France from Subsaharan Africa. Representation of Africa and African in contemporary African novels; (2) Memorialization in the post-genocide Rwanda through art and literature. Process of memorialization in the Congo DRC through contemporary fiction and films. (3) Literary field of African Francophone novels in the French publishing industry, book market, postcolonial publishing industry.

  • Roy CaldwellModern Languages and Literatures(1) French popular song texts; (2) French film; (3) Contemporary and twentieth-century French novel.

  • Robin CrowellModern Languages and Literatures(1) Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Teacher Training - this includes theory, methods, instructional strategies, teaching in under-resourced situations, technology and teaching, English for Specific Purposes, and lesson planning. Also conversation partner program and training writing and conversation tutors; (2)  Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages - teaching English to non-native speakers both in informal and formal verse, ages 12 and up, listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and academic English. Teaching English via Skype, in Rwanda, community members, and SLU university students; (3) Rwanda - teaching in Rwanda, language transition issues, teacher training, working with a women's sewing cooperative and Team Rwanda, the national cycling team.

  • Aída Díaz de LeónModern Languages and Literatures: (1) Literature and film of Latin America; (2) Historical memory in Latin America, particularly in the Southern Cone;           (3) Autobiography and biopolitics in Latin America.

  • Alessandro GiardinoModern Languages and Literatures: (1) Renaissance Studies, Baroque and Neobaroque Visual Culture, French Literature, French Art History, Mediterranean Studies, Italian Literature, Italian-Jewish Literature, Italian Art History, Visual Semiotics, Psychoanalysis; (2) Human Geography of Mediterranean Cities; (3) Romance Languages.

  • Brook Henkel, Modern Languages and Literatures: (1) German language, culture, and history; (2) 20th-century German literature and film; (3) Theory and history of media.

  • Khalid Kitito, Modern Languages and Literatures: (1) Swahili language and culture; (2) Education; (3) Counseling

  • Marina Llorente, Center for International & Intercultural Studies: Contemporary Spanish Poetry, Historical Memory, Social Movements, International Education, Spanish Popular Culture, Hispanic Protest Music, Ethics and Literature

  • Zhenjun Zhang, Modern Languages and Literatures: (1) Chinese language and translation; (2) Chinese literature and film; (3) Chinese religions and culture.

Music

  • Michael Farley, Music: (1) Music composition and arranging. "Making sense" of pitch sets, rhythmic cells, gestures, timbres, space in relation to available forces and locations. Careful consideration of tension/release listener/observer expectations; (2) FYS/FYP: Writing, research, manipulation of media, living together cooperatively and ethically; (3) "Making sense" of multi-media: images, sounds, spaces.

  • Barbara Phillips-Farley, Music(1) 19th-century Europe: Since I am a pianist, the largest part of my repertoire is 19th-century European art music ("classical music") -- music by Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Brahms, Debussy, and Ravel. The last-mentioned obviously extend into early 20th century aesthetics. In teaching my course The World of Clara and Robert Schumann I have deepened my knowledge of the politics, social conditions, and aesthetics of this era; (2) 1890-1945 New York City: This includes music of the New York stage (vaudeville, late minstrelsy, Broadway and revues such as the Ziegfeld Follies, and what is often called Tin Pan Alley -- the popular music industry, out of which come the "great American songbook" standards). It also includes immigration, the social conditions in the NYC tenements, and Jewish contributions to American culture; (3) late 16th-century through 18th-century Europe, especially what we now call Italy, Germany, and Austria: Again, through teaching two courses, Music in Venice and Mozart and the Classical Period, I have a grasp of the politics, social conditions, and aesthetics of this time.

Native American Studies

  • Melissane SchremsHistoryThe influence of the universal concepts of freedom, equality, and justice as expressed in the American Revolution and the United States founding in the US and beyond., Cultural Appropriation, Cultural, political and economic persistence of Indigenous peoples, The international roots of the American founding, Native Americans in American history, Public history, The international influence of the Parish Family, The founding of Fort de La Présentation, Catholic influence in the settlement of the North Country, The history of Work in the Adirondack North Country, The influence of religion on American culture and politics, The American colonial period, The American Early republican period, Iroquois History, Cherokee History, The history of POC in undergraduate and graduate institutions

  • Brenda PapineauCommunity Based Learning

Performance & Communication Arts (PCA)

  • Juraj KittlerPCA: (1) Public Sphere as a space where a given society can negotiate its positions toward its core social, political, economic, cultural issues (2) Media & Mediating Technologies through with the public sphere operates [face-to-face encounters; public art & architecture; traditional media & social media] (3) Urban Space that serves as a physical envelope for any social action

  • Jessica ProdyPCA: (1) Environmental Rhetoric/Communication; (2)Sustainable Advocacy; (3) Feminist Rhetoric & Feminist Studies

  • Allie RowlandPCA: (1) Public Speaking; (2) Rhetoric of health and medicine, health humanities, health communication, public health; (3) Rhetorical theory, cultural studies, social theory, critical/cultural studies.

  • Angela Sweigart-Gallagher,  PCA: (1) women and gender; (2)  relational and critical pedagogy: Many of my teaching interests and practices are encompassed by these two teaching philosophies. Both focus on creating a more collaborative learning environment in which students co-create knowledge and the teacher takes on a different classroom role; (3) Applied theatre and Arts Across the discipline this research and teaching area focuses on using drama and the arts to teach in other disciplines.

  • Jennifer Thomas, PCA(1) Performance--Physical, Vocal, and Emotional expressions; (2) Social and Political Identities; (3) Pedagogy and Practices in Higher Education.

Philosophy

  • Katharine Wolfe, Philosophy: (1) Ethics (including medical ethics) (2) Feminist philosophy (3) Critical thinking, especially as it pertains to issues of social justice

  • Jeff MaynesPhilosophy: (1) Philosophy of Language and Mind; (2) Environmental Philosophy; (3) Critical Reasoning and Logic.

  • Erin McCarthyPhilosophy: (1): Feminist Philosophy (2): Asian and Comparative Philosophy (3):Contemplative Education / Contemplative Studies

  • Laura Rediehs, Philosophy: (1) Peace Studies, especially envisioning a more peaceful world, the ethics and pragmatics of nonviolent conflict resolution, and reconciliation across paradigms that appear incommensurable; (2) Philosophy of Science and Religion, especially developing an epistemology that supports both scientific and religious inquiry; (3) History of Philosophy, especially Modern European Philosophy of the 17th and 18th centuries, and 20th century history of philosophy of science (logical positivism and its failure).

Physics

  • Aileen O'Donoghue, Physics: (1)Study of the laws governing the physical interactions of objects through contact forces and forces acting at a distance such as gravity, electromagnetic forces and nuclear forces; (2) Astronomy: Study of celestial objects such as planets stars and galaxies and the study of the universe itself including matter-energy, space-time, dark matter, dark energy and their origin and evolution; (3) Global Climate: Study of the basic meteorology and weather patterns and their long-term extension as climate across the globe. Study, also, of the global climates through Earth history to learn how changes humanity is contributing may affect the entire climate system.

Psychology

  • Elyssa Twedt, Psychology: (1) Spatial cognition including navigation, perception of spatial layout, object location memory, and individual differences (2) Effects of technology on perception and cognition (3) Research methods and statistics

  • Loraina GhiraldiPsychology: (1) The influence of hormones on behavior and mental processes; (2) Research methods and ethics in psychology -- with human and non-human subjects; (3) Introductory psychology.

  • Thomas Greene, Psychology(1) Environmental perception and cognition:. Landscape and architectural aesthetics, cognitive mapping, wayfinding, color, perception of degradation due to pollutants; (2) Design and participation in design: Architectural psychology, urban planning, campus planning, public spaces; (3) Work and restorative environments: Outdoor recreation planning, human factors engineering, museums, playgrounds and creative spaces.

  • Serge Onyper, Psychology: (1) Human learning and memory; (2) Health and health-related behaviors in humans or animal models; (3) The effects of media and technology on perception, cognition, memory, and mental health.

  • Jenny SuPsychology(1) Culture; (2) Psychology; (3) Morality/ethics. 

  • Laura Mills-Smith: (1): Developmental Psychology, especially prenatal, infant, and early childhood development (2): Infant language acquisition and the social context in which it develops, including issues of joint attention, parental sensitivity, social cues, and perceptions of people as agents (3): perceptual development in infancy, especially visual and audiovisual perception and social perception.

Religious Studies

  • Mark MacWilliams, Religious Studies: (1) Pilgrimage. Mainly East Asia; (2) Pop culture; (3) East Asian religions.

  • Damon Berry, Religious Studies: (1) American religious histories; (2) Research method & theory; (3) Religion & politics/American.

  • Kathleen SelfReligious Studies: (1) Medieval Europe - The religious history of medieval Europe, primarily Christianity and pagan (pre-Christian) religions of Europe. Religious conversion during the Middle Ages and crusading both abroad and within Europe itself. Gender and women in medieval Europe; (2) Religious conversions and transformations - both medieval and modern. When people change religions, what changes? It isn't always belief, but it almost always is about identity and one's sense of self. Religions are also transformed by contact with other religions, resulting in synthesis, hybridization, or reactions against those in the name of religious "purity."; (3) Religion and diversity - questioning definitions of religion in cultures, past and present. Learning how to question one's assumptions about religion and its relationship to culture.

Sociology

  • Daniel McLane, Sociology: (1) Sustainable Development: I critically examine the idea of development as well as sustainability with a special focus on Latin America; (2) Climate Change and Global Politics: I focus on the interplay of global politics and policies related to climate change and local adaptations with a focus in rural Panama; (3) Social Constructions of Nature: How different societies define the idea of "nature" and "human" and the relationship between these two constructs.

  • Leah RohlfsenSociology: (1) Medical Sociology, Public Health, Health Disparities; (2) Aging, the Life Course, Gender; (3) Research Methods, Qualitative Research Methods, Quantitative Research Methods, SPSS, Excel, Stata

  • Stephen Barnard, Sociology: (1) Media and Journalism; (2) Technology, Power and Social Change; (3) Culture and Identity

  • Yesim BayarSociology: (1)Citizenship, and how citizens - specifically religious minorities- navigate "hostile" social and political landscapes. My empirical focus is on the Armenian community in Canada (Quebec and Ontario). I have been collecting oral histories which also touch upon genocide and how genocide impacts on the present generations; (2) My teaching and research interests also revolve around nationalism and nation-building, and how the state, and the political elite design policies which in turn shape social and political change in general, and minority rights and freedoms in particular; (3) I am also interested in the process of constitution-writing, and the reasons behind variation in these processes (as well as different understandings of the notion of constitutions) from a historical and comparative perspective.