Learning Goals

Studio Art Courses:  Student Learning Objectives

I. CONTENT

1.     Formulate an understanding of artistic practice and produce artworks employing media and techniques that support ideation.

2.     Connect artistic practice to historical and contemporary works and research.

II. CRITICAL THINKING

1.     Develop sound research methods and studio practice(s) demonstrating complex thought, analysis and reasoning.

2.     Perform verbal and written critical assessment of one’s and others’ works.

III. PRESENTATION

1.     Create a portfolio that meets disciplinary standards and practices.

2.     Communicate art research and production using appropriate language, documentation, writing, or installation.
 

Art History Courses:  Student Learning Objectives

I. GRASP OF CONTENT; SKILLS IN VISUAL LITERACY AND PERCEPTION 

1.    Familiarity with artists, works, movements, and historical/cultural contexts foregrounded in our Art History courses.

2.    An understanding of principles of composition, including color, shape, linear configurations, etc., with an awareness of the psychological impact of visual form. 

3.    An understanding of the rhetorical functions of imagery, both historically and in contemporary culture.

II. CRITICAL THINKING AND READING SKILLS

1.    The ability to distinguish fact from conjecture and interpretation.

2.    The ability to assess the validity of theories and arguments.

3.     The ability to evaluate differing viewpoints and to formulate individual, well-informed perspectives.

4.      The ability to approach issues from multiple critical perspectives, and to appreciate the reasons for more than one point of view.

III. RESEARCH SKILLS

1.     The ability to find information on any given topic, and to be discriminating about the source and quality of that information. 

2.     The ability to distinguish between what one brings to a topic and what comes from other sources, and to make proper acknowledgement of those sources.

IV. WRITTEN AND ORAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS 

1.         The ability to formulate clear arguments, supported by evidence.

2.         Control of the elements of grammar, syntax, word choice, and punctuation.

3.         The ability to write skillfully for a broad range of audiences, both academic and general, using the appropriate voices, formats, and levels of formality.

4.         Articulate oral communication.