Sustainability Program Blog

St. Lawrence University's Sustainability Program is an off-campus living-learning program located 5 miles from the SLU campus where students create community together with the goals of living sustainably in a renovated farm house, growing and preserving their own food and building both theoretical and practical knowledge pertaining to sustainability. The students take classes together on site, focused on aspects of sustainability. They cook and share meals together, bake bread, do farm and house chores, engage in projects including wood working, maple sugaring, soap making, and other crafts, and work with community members involved in homesteading, farming, green building and more. This blog is written by the students participating in the Sustainability& Program and gives a snap shot of their reflections and experiences.

by Olivia Raynard
Class of 2019
July 25th, 2017
           As I began my journey of living tiny, I knew I was going to face some challenges and receive some skeptical looks. One of the first major challenges I faced, was searching for and deciding on the right trailer. Since the trailer will be the base of my tiny...
by Celine Schreiber
Class of 2020
July 23rd, 2017
The Parsley in my head: About farming and failing It is 6.30 in the morning and I open the door to the greenhouse. Light green beet sprouts seem to smile at me, my newly seeded basil is waving. Thank god, I think: they germinated. Then, my eyes meet the empty tray. No. No, no, no. The Parsley. Or...
by Olivia Raynard
Class of 2019
July 13th, 2017
         We got 6 baby turkeys in the mail on June 7th, a little over a month ago. We have watched them transition from little fluff balls we could cup in our hands, to now being a little less than a foot tall with feathers covering their bodies. It was crazy watching them...
by Olivia Raynard
Class of 2019
July 10th, 2017
           Last year, during my freshman year at St. Lawrence, I attempted to go vegetarian, but noticed an immediate drop in my energy, which I coincided with lack of meat. Therefore, about a month after I started, I decided to stop and start eating meat again. Ever...
by Olivia Raynard
Class of 2019
June 29th, 2017
            When people think about farming they tend to forget about how much influence the weather has over the final product. Throughout the growing seasons, farmers are constantly battling and working with the weather. However, with this increase of climate change...
by Celine Schreiber
Class of 2020
June 29th, 2017
  Yesterday we helped David Rice at Sweetcore farm. David is an organic farmer that specialized in producing organic fruits from orchards. We have visited David a couple of weeks ago already, where he showed us how to train the trees, which means guiding the branches to grow vertically instead...
by Olivia Raynard
Class of 2019
June 28th, 2017
              Prior to me deciding to build a tiny house, I have never used a power tool and had never built anything in my life. Since I decided to build my tiny house, I have started pushing myself outside my comfort zone and have been slowly gaining more...
by Heinrich Salzmann
Class of 202
June 28th, 2017
The Seed to Table student club runs a permaculture garden behind Commons College on Campus. The idea of permaculture captures food production in a setting where plants live multiple years opposed to the common annual growing cycles. In theory, this concept has a high potential because the ground is...
by Heinrich Salzmann
Class of 2020
June 25th, 2017
The strawberries are the first major harvest we had on the farm. We could only pick some greens and rhubarb before. After the excitement and enjoyment of the first ripe strawberries, warm and sunny weather let the real harvest come along. Strawberries also meant the beginning of food preservation...
by Celine Schreiber
Class of 2020
June 23rd, 2017
Spraying is either good or bad, and organic farmers do not spray. That is the opinion of many consumers, a misconception that not only overgeneralizes the agricultural industry but also has the potential to harm organic farmers. Many people have little or no idea why farmers spray, what they spray...
by Olivia Raynard
Class of 2019
June 23rd, 2017
           The tiny house movement has really started to gain momentum in recent years and grabbed my attention about two years ago, when my parents first introduced me to them. At first, I wasn’t “wowed” by them, but then, I started to dig further and learned about...
by Heinrich Salzmann
Class of 2020
June 20th, 2017
One of the nice things of doing an internship at the farm are independent project. There is a wide range of projects we have planned for this summer, from building a tiny house to fermenting food. I was a bit lost and not sure what to do, choosing out of all these topics connected to farming, food...

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