Sustainability Program Blog

St. Lawrence University's Sustainability Program is an off-campus living-learning program located 5 miles from the SLU campus where students create community together with the goals of living sustainably in a renovated farm house, growing and preserving their own food and building both theoretical and practical knowledge pertaining to sustainability. The students take classes together on site, focused on aspects of sustainability. They cook and share meals together, bake bread, do farm and house chores, engage in projects including wood working, maple sugaring, soap making, and other crafts, and work with community members involved in homesteading, farming, green building and more. This blog is written by the students participating in the Sustainability& Program and gives a snap shot of their reflections and experiences.

by William Sanford
Class of 2019
November 7th, 2017
            Just recently everyone at St. Lawrence received an email about reestablishing and revitalizing the SLU Republicans club. The reasoning behind this was that many republicans here at St. Lawrence feel alienated talking about their...
by Rose West
Class of 2020
October 30th, 2017
             From a distanced eye, the row of storage kohlrabi looked sturdy and formidable, they were the biggest I had ever seen Yet, on closer inspection, some of these giants were hallow and damaged. It was obvious they had been in a fight, and lost: but to...
by Rose West
Class of 2020
October 30th, 2017
I was not directly involved with helping board the pigs onto the trailer on their final morning. I was on the peripherals of the activity, getting my final glimpses of the two unnamed swine while I was finishing up morning chores. Nevertheless, it provoked thought regarding how we get meat and made...
by Rose West
Class of 2020
October 30th, 2017
Midway through the semester it seems I am at an ideal point for reflection. Sustainability is an overarching ideology of the program and yet I still find myself flustered by the lack of  concrete definition to go with it. I admit it is something that is hard not to obsess over in relation to...
by Ursula Martin
Class of 2020
October 30th, 2017
I've tossed around the idea of going vegetarian numerous times over the past few years, but I've never gotten close to actually doing it. The idea of having to put in extra effort to get all of my necessary nutrients, imposing on my family members to cook vegetarian meals, and not being able to eat...
by Ursula Martin
Class of 2020
October 30th, 2017
One morning, it suddenly occurred to me that I was not where I had expected to be. In retrospect, this should not have come as a surprise; I had expected to be living in a dorm, quietly writing poetry in my spare time, sleeping until 10 o’clock. Now, I found myself squatting on an overturned bucket...
by Ursula Martin
Class of 2020
October 30th, 2017
What can you make from cabbage that’s nutritious and filling, but also tastes good? This is the question I found myself asking on Friday night, when it was Rose and my turn to cook dinner for the house. After scanning the refrigerator for ingredients and seeing the usual goat’s milk, tofu, cheese,...
by Heinrich Salzmann
Class of 2020
October 29th, 2017
Having two dairy goats at the farm means a constant supply of milk. More milk than we drink or eat directly. However, as we eat many dairy products, cheese, ice cream, sour and whipped cream, and yogurt. All these products are derivatives of milk, but they vary greatly in the degree of processing....
by Heinrich Salzmann
Class of 2020
October 7th, 2017
Original recipes of bread include only a handful of very basic ingredients: flour, water, sourdough culture, and salt. The sourdough culture is responsible for the transformation of a flour and water mix to a real dough to bake fresh bread. This conversion is made possible by bacteria called...
by Heinrich Salzmann
Class of 2020
September 14th, 2017
The sustainability program started off with a few visits to North Country Farms. One reoccurring topic seemed to be that the size of the farm needs to be tailored to the working methods, equipment, as well as the market they are producing for in order to be successful. The nostalgic view of a small...
by Celine Schreiber
Class of 2020
August 9th, 2017
For about three months, from about Mid-May until mid-August, I spent my time on the SLU Sustainability Site as the Seed to Table Club summer intern. I have learned a great deal and was able to meet local farmers to hear about their experiences with trying to make a living of small-scale farming in...
by Olivia Raynard
Class of 2019
July 25th, 2017
           As I began my journey of living tiny, I knew I was going to face some challenges and receive some skeptical looks. One of the first major challenges I faced, was searching for and deciding on the right trailer. Since the trailer will be the base of my tiny...

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