Current Faculty Fellows

Fall 2016 - Spring 2017 Cohort

Matthew Carotenuto (Associate Professor, History and Coordinator of African Studies) will use this fellowship to enhance the digital presence and pedagogy of the SLU-Kenya connection and integrate the existing Kenya program blog and digital archive into his teaching and research.

Jeff Frank (Assistant Professor of Education) will use this fellowship to explore how to make the humanities accessible to the populations we intend to serve in a digital age. He writes, "I am particularly interested in how teachers can use the digital resources at hand to become more human(e) educators."

Evelyn Jennings (Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Advising Programs) will use this fellowship to better conceptualize, assess, and use the the digital pedagogies she integrates into her teaching, and particularly how to create and share digital materials on Latin American History in a way that "moves beyond only text-based sharing of discoveries and interpretation."

Jeffrey Maynes (Assistant Professor, Philosophy) will use this fellowship to explore digital, social annotation techniques to help students develop critical reading techniques for approaching dense texts. He also plans to study the interpretive questions raised by the use of digital tools in experimental philosophy.

Laura Rediehs (Associate Professor, Philosophy) will use this fellowship to explore how digital tools might help students and researchers better understand the networks of influence that shaped important philosophical developments during the rise of modern science in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Melissane Parm Schrems (Associate Professor, History and Coordinator of Native American Studies) will use this fellowship to better understand how to create and use digital media and archives in her teaching and in her research into the Mashpee-Wampanoag town of Mashpee in the 19th century. She links this project to the goal of making history more accessible, part of her "responsibility to remind my students and the general public of history’s relevance." 

Continuing Fellows (Spring 2016 - Fall 2016 Cohort)

Elun Gabriel (Associate Professor and Chair, History) will use this fellowship to examine the geospatial and temporal aspects of the Rwandan Genocide through data visualizations that will help students in his Genocide in the Modern World course better understand and analyze the uneven unfolding of violence.

Dorothy Limouze (Flint Professor of Art & Art History) will use this fellowship to begin developing a digital repository of student research on objects in the University Art Collection, including virtual exhibitions, for her Museums Seminar. While in the past, students have written both longer essay and wall labels for actual exhibitions in the Brush Art Gallery, in 2016 and future semesters, Professor Limouze wishes to engage students in virtual exhibitions which will offer greater flexibility as well as excellent archival possibilities.

Jennifer Thomas (Assistant Professor, Performance and Communication Arts) aims to lengthen and broaden the theatrical experience for her students involved in production, as well as broader audiences, by offering in-depth exposure to production elements such as script selection, design conversations, casting, rehearsals, technical rehearsals, and “post-mortem” conversations. This project -- now live at http://www.flippingthestage.org/ -- harnesses the interdisciplinary potential of theatre to blur the distinctions between academic and artistic and between curricular and co-curricular in order to expand the theatrical experience beyond the performance for actors, designers, technicians, and audiences alike.