Graduate Courses

Courses in Education (The following courses have a prefix “EDUC”)

500. Research Project in Education 1-3 sem. hrs.

504. Applications of Educational Technology 3 sem. hrs.
An exploration of new developments in technology germane to application in educational settings. The course will focus on the infusion of new technologies into the work of teachers, counselors, and school administrators, providing students with opportunities to individualize their learning in optimal ways. Topics can include technology evaluation, curriculum development, assessment strategies, and administrative uses of technology in the schools.

507. Philosophy of Education 3 sem. hrs.
The background, nature and significance of various educational problems are considered from both the theoretical and practical viewpoints. Some contrasting viewpoints on educational goals, on solving educational problems and on evaluating educational outcomes are considered. 515.

515. Conflict Resolution 3 sem. hrs.
A study of, and an involvement of class members in, the resolution of conflict on at least four levels: (1) intrapersonal (within oneself), (2) oneto- one (as in marriage), (3) small-group to small-group (as in negotiations), and (4) large-group to large-group (as with national conflicts, revolutions or riots).

516. Issues and Ethics in the Human Service Professions 3 sem. hrs.
This course provides an opportunity to examine personal belief systems regarding contemporary professional, ethical and legal concerns. Topics include rights and responsibilities of clients, counselors, teachers and related school personnel. Values, cultural diversification, confidentiality and issues related to individual, family and group are explored. Self-evaluation appraisals are used to clarify individual values and roles.

519. Educational Statistics and Research 3 sem. hrs.
Educational Statistics and Research is designed to assist students in the examination and understanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods. This examination process is facilitated by close scrutiny of educational literature and engaging in the presentation and working through of research problems. The rationale of the course is to: (1) increase intentional awareness of the research process, (2) evaluate articles in the professional literature, (3) apply research and evaluation.

524. Multi-Cultural Education and Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
This course takes an inclusive approach to both counseling and education. It emphasizes diverse issues and techniques encountered by counselors and teachers in our pluralistic society. Included are multi-cultural and cross-cultural counseling; social and cultural foundations in education; and social and cultural issues in the work of counselor and teachers.

525. Alternative Education: Models for School Restructuring 3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to help participants develop an awareness of alternative approaches to the traditional school structure, with the purpose of developing models for the implementation of the New York State Regents’ New Compact for Learning. In addition to developing a working definition of “restructuring,” a variety of models will be examined. These models include, but are not limited to, the Quality School, the Coalition of Essential Schools and the German School model of family grouping. Participants will be facilitated in a discussion of theories and principles through reading and presentations by local practitioners.

530. Constructivist Practices in Education 3 sem. hrs.
How does a teacher or administrator implement constructivist strategies for today’s learner-centered classroom? This course examines classroom strategies based on the learning theory of constructivism in which students are believed to learn by constructing new understandings of relationships and phenomena (Brooks & Brooks, 1993) in the world around them. Students will evaluate the impact of constructivist strategies on student learning and achievement; experience learner-centered strategies; and apply them in their own teaching situations. Among the strategies explored in this class are eliciting students’ prior knowledge, use of hands-on activities, working in cooperative and collaborative groups, inquiry-based questions, self and peer assessment, reflective practices and authentic performance-based assessment activities.

540. Language Acquisition and Literacy Development across the Curriculum 3 sem. hrs.
A multidisciplinary consideration of the ways young people learn the language arts--speaking, reading, writing and listening. Inherent in the consideration is the fact that learners bring different abilities and backgrounds to the undertaking; instruction in the course covers those types of individuals typically found in inclusive classrooms--students with disabilities, students whose native language is other than English and students from different cultures and ethnic backgrounds. A field experience in the public schools is required.

548. Educational Tests, Measurements, and Evaluation 3 sem. hrs.
The course assists students in the analysis of the theories, techniques and philosophical positions of testing. It considers evaluation of pupil progress and achievement by means of teacher-constructed tests. It reviews standardized tests of intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interest and personality, with emphasis on interpretation and use of results. The rationale of the course is to foster an informed consumer stance of psychological and educational tests and assessment procedures.

551. Relationships between Schools and Families 3 sem. hrs.
This course will explore family, school, and community relationships. It is designed for counselors, teachers, and administrators. The course will cover research that addresses different factors influencing family involvement and teaching practices that encourage parent involvement. Students will be exposed to examining partnerships from a systemic framework and to communicating with diverse types of families. The text will outline six different types of involvement for creating partnerships between schools and families, as well as ways to involve the community. Finally, students will discuss proper strategies and techniques for improving relationships between different types of families and the schools, and they will explore the partnerships that can be formed.

565/566. Independent Study 3 sem. hrs.

566, SpTp: Pedagogical Content Studies in the Certificate Area 3 sem. hrs.
New sections of this special topics course are planned and offered every year. Each course is designed by content and pedagogy experts to focus on content to be taught in the secondary curriculum in public schools, and aligned with the New York State Learning Standards. Course development occurs in coordination with regional schools to provide opportunity for initially certified teachers to meet professional certification requirements and/or accomplish their professional development plans. Details regarding the studies can be obtained from the department of education.

DEPT 566, SpTp: Subject Matter Studies 3 sem. hrs.
Graduate students may take selected graduate-level versions of upper-level (300-400 level) undergraduate courses in the academic departments at St. Lawrence. In order to enroll, the student must have permission of the instructor, who will provide a separate syllabus (or addendum) with appropriate graduate-level expectations, assignments, and grading criteria. The courses will be transcripted under the departmental title (e.g., English 566, SpTp: Shakespeare’s Tragedies). Graduate students must consult the undergraduate schedule of courses to determine appropriate courses; students must receive permission from the instructor as well as approval by the graduate advisor prior to registration for the course.

573. Teaching and Learning in the Public Schools 3 sem. hrs.
An examination of the teaching process and how to facilitate the academic achievement in the schools. Through readings, library research and videotaped microteaching, the course will give participants opportunity to develop understanding of research-based strategies to facilitate effective teaching/learning processes in the schools. A field experience in the public schools is required.

581. Principles and Practices of Guidance 3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to assist students in the understanding of counseling practices in a comprehensive and capable manner. This understanding is facilitated by the exploration of concepts and practices that prepare counselors in training to develop proactive programs and counseling interventions. Students will increase intentional awareness of how to join and enhance clients’ developmental needs and design counseling programs and interventions that are developmentally, cognitive and culturally appropriate.

585. Seminar: The Dynamics of School Teaching 3 sem. hrs. (Student Teaching Seminar)

586. Supervised Student Teaching 3 sem. hrs.
Students in the Professional Semester enroll in Education 585, 586, 588 and 590 for a full semester of student teaching in the public schools. General supervision by University supervisors in concert with cooperating teachers in the classroom setting. Education 585 and 590 (see below) are taught intensively during the first four weeks of the semester, at which time student teachers undertake a 40-hour field experience in the classroom. Then the courses change to a weekly schedule for the remaining student teaching experience. Instructors discuss problems and concerns arising throughout the professional semester and assist student teachers in understanding their own socialization in the teaching profession. The course focuses on those aspects of the educational environment that promote the establishment and maintenance of a classroom environment that is both safe and conducive to learning. Special workshops in Education 585 cover state-mandated topics including school safety and fire prevention, violence prevention,identification and reporting of child abuse and prevention of drug/alcohol/tobacco abuse. Prerequisites: EDUC 507, EDUC 573 and EDPS 550 (or equivalents). Enrollment by permission only.

588. Individual Differences in Inclusive Classrooms 3 sem. hrs.
This course is integrated into the Professional Semester. It addresses the need for teachers to facilitate the learning of students with a variety of special needs in inclusive classroom settings. Attention is paid to the special education referral and planning process spelled out by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the role of the classroom teacher in meeting the educational needs of mainstreamed students, and strategies for helping all students meet the New York State learning standards. A field experience in the public schools takes place prior to the commencement of student teaching. Prerequisites: EDUC 507, EDUC 573 and EDPS 550 (or equivalents). Enrollment by permission only.

589. Classroom Organization and Management 1 sem. hr.
This course is designed to assist student teachers in the Professional Semester develop successful approaches to classroom management for diverse learners. Students investigate current theories in classroom organization and behavior management, critically analyzing them according to recent research on learning and school structure. As a part of the Professional Semester, students apply theories learned in the course in actual classroom situations. The NYSED mandated two-hour workshop on Prevention of School Violence is incorporated into the syllabus for this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 507, EDUC 573 and EDPS 550 (or equivalents). Enrollment by permission only.

590. Methods, Materials and Literacy in the Content Area 3 sem. hrs.
As a part of the Professional Semester, separate sections of this course are offered in art, English, foreign languages, mathematics, social studies and the sciences. Each section involves a study of standards and objectives, special techniques appropriate for the teaching of the particular subject, materials and aids for facilitating instruction, lesson and unit planning and assessment, and an analysis of problems unique to the teaching of the subject. Focus throughout the course is on strategies for language acquisition and literacy development in alignment with the New York State learning standards. Prerequisites: EDUC 507, EDUC 573 and EDPS 550 (or equivalents). Enrollment by permission only.

595. Teacher Internship/Mentorship Program 3-6 sem. hrs.
Provisionally and initially certified new teachers who plan to use the M.Ed. in General Studies in Education for professional certification are encouraged to build into their program of studies a teacher internship or mentorship in keeping with NYSED regulations. Guidelines for the program may be obtained in the department of education.

599. Curriculum Development 3 sem. hrs.
An applied, project-oriented course focusing on school curriculum development from an instructional and administrative perspective. Issues such as needs analysis, financing, staffing, scheduling and evaluation are explored. The format consists of classroom-based activities, independent project development and evaluation, and project presentations. Emphasis is generally K-12.

600. Thesis 3-6 sem. hrs.

Courses in Educational Leadership (The following courses have a prefix “EDAD.”)

504. Applications of Educational Technology 3 sem. hrs.
This course explores new developments in technology germane to application in educational settings. It focuses on the infusion of new technologies into the work of teachers, counselors and school administrators, providing students with opportunities to individualize their learning in optimal ways. Topics include individualizing instruction, project learning, curriculum development, assessment strategies and administrative uses of technology in the schools. Students will discuss processes for developing a vision for creating a long-range, district-wide technology plan with achievable goals and objectives based on existing and projected resources designed to improve student achievement.

511. School Organization and Management 3 sem. hrs.
This course is a study of administrative theory and practice designed to prepare prospective principals for leadership in public schools. Attention is given to administrative and leadership concepts and theories, decision-making, trends in school organization, curriculum patterns and practices, staffing, supervision and community relations. All of the Essential Characteristics and Content Requirements are introduced to students and discussed within the context of this course.

513. Models of Leadership and Management 3 sem. hrs.
This seminar is designed to increase the student’s understanding of modern leadership and managerial behavior through analysis of the knowledge, research and theory of the behavioral sciences related to leadership and organizations. Students will analyze leadership styles, management models, organizational climate, and problem solving strategies. All of the Essential Characteristics and the Content Requirements are introduced to students and discussed within the context of this course.

515. Conflict Resolution 3 sem. hrs.
A study of and an involvement of class members in the resolution of conflict on at least four levels: (1) interpersonal (within oneself), (2) oneto- one (as in marriage). (3) small-group (as in negotiations) and (4) large group (as in national conflicts, revolutions, riots, etc.).

516. Issues and Ethics in Human Service Professions 3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to examine personal belief systems regarding contemporary professional, ethical and legal concerns. Topics include rights and responsibilities of clients, counselors, teachers and related school personnel. Values, cultural diversification, confidentiality and issues related to individual, family and group are explored. Self-evaluation appraisals are used to clarify individual values and roles.

517. Leadership and School Climate 3 sem. hrs.
This course is an introduction to emotional climates that surround the public school setting. Essential questions that are relevant to changing the climate affecting the everyday living environment found in these schools are identified and answered. Strategies for identifying and conciliating emotional climates such as resentment, anger, envy, ego anxiety and apathy are explored. Feedback about school climate plays an important role in school reform and student achievement; students will measure school climate in real settings, tapping students, parents, teachers and administrators as sources of feedback.

523. Public School Finance 3 sem. hrs.
A study of the principles and processes underlying school finance and of the resources at federal, state and local levels that support education. Various theories from economics and education affecting trends in school support will be explored. Budgetary practice as an instrument of leadership will receive analysis. The budgetary process across the school year will be analyzed from budget vote to budget vote.

525. Alternative Models for School Restructuring 3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to help participants develop an awareness of alternative approaches to the traditional school structure with the purpose of developing models for the implementation of the New York State standards and assessment initiatives. The work of Glasser, Covey, Gardner, Senge, Sarason, Sizer and others will be explored. Students discuss theories and principles extracted from various readings and presentations by local practitioners.

528. Leadership for Special Education 3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to familiarize the practitioner with special education laws and regulations and their implications for school building and district leaders. Federal and state laws and regulations provide the framework through which critical issues such as least restrictive environment and discipline and conceptual understandings such as equity will be addressed. Case studies, simulations and independent projects provide the opportunity to apply knowledge and develop insights.

532. Supervision of Instruction 3 sem. hrs.
A study of the philosophy and the practices of instructional supervision and a consideration of the problems encountered in developing principles and practices to govern a sound supervisory program in the public schools. Supervision for the improvement of student achievement will be explored.

537. School Law 3 sem. hrs.
A study of the basic principles of constitutional, case and statutory law affecting the leadership and operation of the public school. Particular stress is given to New York State statutes and administrative regulations as illustrative of basic principles. Students will examine the legal reasoning process and apply that to case studies and simulations in public school situations, and work in groups to explore case studies at the federal, state and local levels.

539. Planning and Sustaining Educational Change 3 sem. hrs.
The course deals with myths and realities of leadership, better communication for improving staff effectiveness and staff leadership, decision-making in the social-political climate of the school, managing student behavior, personal goal development and career decision-making, all in relation to planning and sustaining educational change. Permission of the instructor is required.

542. The Negotiation Process 3 sem. hrs.
This course covers sociological and psychological aspects of negotiation, the uniqueness of bargaining situations, the effect of bargaining as a change agent and bargaining and professionalism. Both positional and win-win bargaining strategies and processes will be addressed.

543. Leadership of School/Business Partnerships I 3 sem. hrs.
The focus of this course is to engage students in an ongoing schoolbusiness partnership in order to develop specific leadership competencies. Students serve as partnership liaisons and work directly with local corporations to negotiate a project plan in engineering, human services, marketing, economics, health services and/or information systems to be implemented in a Tech-Prep course of study in a local high school. Students develop leadership and teaching skills to supervise, guide, evaluate and interact with corporate partners and high school students within the partnership. EDAD 544 (below) must also be taken in order to receive credit for this course.

544. Leadership of School/Business Partnerships II 3 sem. hrs.
This course is a continuation of EDAD 543, Leadership of School-Business Partnerships I. The focus of this course is to engage students in an ongoing school-business partnership program as a means to enhance specific leadership competencies. In this second semester, students focus on facilitating the research and development on solutions to an assigned corporate case study. They conduct weekly meetings for the case study group of four or five high school students, employing leadership and teaching skills to supervise, guide, evaluate and interact with the high school students as they work to complete the project within the specified timeframe. Pre-requisite: EDAD 543.

548. Data-Informed Decision Making
This course will focus on the study of the principles and processes underlying the use of data as a strategy to increase student and teacher performance.   By studying the works of Marzano, Bambrick-Santoyo, McLoud and others, participants will examine current research, practice and systems currently being utilized to increase teacher effectiveness and student achievement.  Students will also investigate the roles of students, teachers administrators and parents in the process and trends as they relate to high stakes assessment.

550. Organization and Leadership of School Districts 3 sem. hrs.
A study of the governance of modern school districts from the perspective of federal, state, regional and local levels. Emphasis is on the daily operation of an educational organization in a dynamic society and profession.

551. Relationships between Schools and Families 3 sem. hrs.
This course will explore family, school, and community relationships. It is designed for counselors, teachers, and administrators. The course will cover research that addresses different factors influencing family involvement and teaching practices that encourage parent involvement. Students will be exposed to examining partnerships from a systemic framework and to communicating with diverse types of families. The text will outline six different types of involvement for creating partnerships between schools and families, as well as ways to involve the community. Finally, students will discuss proper strategies and techniques for improving relationships between different types of families and the schools, and they will explore the partnerships that can be formed.

553. Educational Leadership 3 sem. hrs.
A study of varied roles delegated and assumed by public school leader. Topics include the administrative team, staff recruitment and retention, personnel management, and program development and articulation. Special emphasis is on career development and planning for the aspiring school leader.

554. Building-Level Leadership 3 sem. hrs.
The purposes of this course are to assist participants in the development of a knowledge base and understanding of the major aspects of school leadership at the building level and to provide participants with selected opportunities to apply this knowledge and understanding.

560. Current Problems in Educational Leadership 3 sem. hrs.
A seminar dealing with educational problems, issues and concerns. Students will be expected to investigate, research and discuss selected educational issues. The course format includes lectures, analysis of case studies and group discussions coupled with independent study. A project developed in the area of student interest is required.

565,566. Independent Study in Educational Leadership 3 sem. hrs.
Research projects in the area of school leadership designed to expand the knowledge base of the student in his or her acquisition of the Essential Characteristics of Effective Leadership and the Content Requirements.

579. Seminar in Curriculum, Instruction and Supervision 3 sem. hrs.
A consideration of problems and issues in the improvement of curriculum and instruction. Each student will do an independent study project on a problem or issue of significance and present that project to the class for discussion.

582. Current Research in Educational Leadership 3 sem. hrs.
This course is organized around case studies that illustrate the need for reliance upon a research base to resolve the issue at hand. Both potential and practicing administrators review and discuss current research relative to issues such as class size, length and sequence of instructional periods, effectiveness of particular teaching approaches, arrangement and size of physical space, etc. A strategic planning model for using the research findings in making educational decisions is explored, with an emphasis on shared decision-making. Each participant is asked to become a miniexpert on a particular topic or question and to share his or her expertise with the class in the form of a presentation and related readings.

586. Issues in School District Leadership 3 sem. hrs.
Participants explore practical approaches to issues such as school budget, curriculum/program initiatives, school board relations, contract leadership, shared decision-making, long-range planning, physical plan maintenance, policy development, public relations and others.

591. Educational Leadership Internship/Culminating Experience 3 sem. hrs.
Supervised experience in various areas of school leadership for a select number of advanced matriculated graduate students in the leadership program. Prerequisites are satisfactory completion of 18 hours or required course work and related 60 hours of supervised field work.

599. Curriculum Development 3 sem. hrs.
An applied project-oriented course focusing on school curriculum development from a leadership perspective. Issues such as needs analysis, financing, staffing, scheduling and evaluation are explored. The format consists of a week of classroom-based activities, a week devoted to independent project development and a week devoted primarily to project presentations.

Courses in Counseling and Human Development (The following courses have a prefix “EDPS”)

504. Applications of Educational Technology 3 sem. hrs.
An exploration of new developments in technology germane to application in educational settings. The course will focus on the infusion of new technologies into the work of teachers, counselors and school administrators, providing students with opportunities to individualize their learning in optimal ways. Topics can include technology evaluation, curriculum development, assessment strategies and administrative uses of technology in the schools.

509. Seminar in Human Sexuality for Counselors 3 sem. hrs.
A survey of the physiology and psychology of human sexual response. The varieties of sexual behaviors and values will be explored along with particular problems of sexual functioning which are often brought to counselors. Adequate opportunity will be provided for students to examine myths about sex and to explore their own values with regard to masculine and feminine roles in contemporary society and various forms of sexual behavior.

510. Theories of Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
A range of contemporary theories of counseling is examined and application to the counseling experience is emphasized. Concepts, assumptions and implications for practice of the counseling orientations are considered. Discussion, observation and experiential activities provide an opportunity for the student to evaluate and integrate the major theoretical approaches to counseling.

512. Marriage and Family Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
This course will review various theories of family development and family counseling, including those of Bowen, Whitaker, Haley and Madones, Minuchin and the Milan associates. Particular attention is focused on strategic and structural approaches, with demonstrations, simulations and practical applications of these approaches incorporated into the course structure. Prerequisites: EDPS 510 and 582, or an earned master’s degree in counseling. EDUC 526 also helpful.

513. Phenomenological Theories for the Helping Professions 3 sem. hrs.
A course which covers the works of the major writers in phenomenology and how their methods and techniques are used in helping professions. The writings of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, Speigelberg, Buber, Schultz, William James, Heidegger, Sartre and others are available for study and discussion.

516. Issues and Ethics in the Human Service Professions 3 sem. hrs.
Issues and Ethics in the Human Service Professions is designed to provide students an opportunity to examine their personal belief systems regarding contemporary professional, ethical, and legal concerns. Topics include rights and responsibilities of clients, counselors, teachers and related school personnel. Values, cultural diversification, confidentiality, and issues related to individual, family and group will be explored. Self-evaluation appraisals are used to clarify individual values and roles.

518. Guidance in the Elementary Schools 3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to help counselors, teachers and administrators develop practical approaches for elementary school guidance. Topics include child development, individual and group counseling, new student screening and the committee on the handicapped. Special emphasis is placed on design and implementation of classroom guidance activities.

523. Aging, Death and Bereavement Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
A phenomenological exploration of the themes dealing with aging and dying and how these themes are handled by persons in the helping professions. The two major foci are: 1) how a helper deals with his or her own aging and dying; and 2) how the helper deals with the aging and dying process of others. Prerequisites: EDPS 510, 582 and permission of the coordinator of the CD program.

524. Multi-Cultural Education and Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
This course takes an inclusive approach to both counseling and education. It emphasizes diverse issues and techniques encountered by counselors and teachers in our pluralistic society. Included in the course are multi-cultural and cross-cultural counseling, social and cultural foundations in education, and social and cultural issues in the work of counselors and teachers.

525. Integrating Seminar for Counselors 3 sem. hrs.
A seminar for a small number of students for the purpose of studying in-depth topics and problems in the field of counseling. The specific topics may be determined in advance by the instructor or by groups in planning sessions. Prerequisites: EDPS 582 and permission of the coordinator of the CD program.

532. Rehabilitation Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
This course approaches the dynamics of rehabilitation counseling. This includes the rehabilitation practices for alcohol, drugs, learning disabilities and other relevant themes. The course is a phenomenological exploration of these themes and how they are handled by persons in the helping professions. Prerequisites: EDPS 510, 582 and permission of the coordinator of the CD program.

535. Mental Health in the Schools 3 sem. hrs.
This course first surveys various theories and programs in the mental health field as a whole. Next, evolving designs for community programs with emphases on prevention, early intervention and children are reviewed. The focus of the course, emotional health in children, is then explored in depth, with emphasis on child development principles and the role of the school in teaching coping skills. Different kinds and sources of emotional disturbance are reviewed, and methods for dealing with them are illustrated. Previous course work in psychology or child development is required.

536. Individual Differences in Children 3 sem. hrs.
This course discusses the roles that major kinds of disabilities affecting children and psychological, educational, social and economic factors play. The important role of school programs is stressed, as is support for families of disabled children. Illustrative case material will be utilized.

538. Learning Disabilities 3 sem. hrs.
The course is designed to increase understanding of the various etiologies of learning disabilities and to develop skills in differential diagnosis and educational remediation. The practicum will involve the student in individual diagnosis, program design, remediation and consultation with teachers. This course in some respects is a sequel to EDPS 536. Check with instructor for prerequisites and permission.

549. Evaluation and Appraisal Techniques 3 sem. hrs.
Individual and group assessment tools utilized by the practicing counselor are examined. Competency develop¬ment in the administration, interpretation and reporting of selected instruments is emphasized. Additional topics include principles of psychological testing, behavioral evaluations, the diagnostic process and current issues in appraisal.

550. Human Development and Life Span Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
Developmental stages over the life span are examined from infancy through late adulthood. Major theories of human development and counseling are reviewed and developmental topics and transitional issues are considered. Implications for the practice of counseling are established for diverse populations through discussion and experiential activities.

551. Relationships between Schools and Families 3 sem. hrs.
This course will explore family, school, and community relationships. It is designed for counselors, teachers, and administrators. The course will cover research that addresses different factors influencing family involvement and teaching practices that encourage parent involvement. Students will be exposed to examining partnerships from a systemic framework and to communicating with diverse types of families. The text will outline six different types of involvement for creating partnerships between schools and families, as well as ways to involve the community. Finally, students will discuss proper strategies and techniques for improving relationships between different types of families and the schools, and they will explore the partnerships that can be formed.

554. Principles of Behavior Change (for teachers and counselors) 3 sem. hrs.
This course focuses on the application of behavior modification procedures for improving students’ school adjustment, ranging from academic tasks to social relations. We will examine procedures for carrying out behavioral assessments and using this information to develop practical and effective school interventions. Methods of behavior modification will be illustrated, with difficulties such as behavior disorders, learning disabilities and developmental delays.

560. Cognitive Science and Learning Theory 3 sem. hrs.
An exploration of new research in cognitive science and learning theory, constructed to provide educators with insights into ways in which academic achievement in the public schools can be enhanced. The course combines theoretical readings and research with opportunities for application and project development in educational settings.

565, 566. Independent Study in Counseling and Development 3 sem. hrs.
The student is expected to present a proposal of the project to a faculty member for approval before registering for the course. During the course of study, periodic conferences help the student accomplish the goals stated in the proposal. Prerequisite: permission of the coordinator of the CD program.

570. Addictions and Disorders in Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the broad field of addictions and the effects on individuals, families and society at large. The student will gain an understanding of the types of drug addictions and dependencies, including alcohol, non-illegal substances, and illegal substances and their connections to process-oriented addictions and emotional addictions. Dependency, tolerance, withdrawal, compulsive behavior, addictive thinking and denial will be examined. The pharmacology of psychoactive drugs will also be reviewed.

573. Introduction to Mental Health Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces students to the primary settings and counseling services found within the mental health field, with special emphasis put on the various models for consultation used with clients and organizations in a variety of settings. The course is designed to enhance student understanding of mental health counseling and to develop skills for working with schools, families, the workplace and communities.

574. Psychopathology in Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
Human behavior is considered from a contemporary perspective for abnormal and maladaptive functioning. A range of mental and emotional disorders are systematically examined, and counseling implications are related to the topics discussed. Identification of disturbed behavior is emphasized and the efficacy of various treatment approaches is evaluated.

575. Clinical Interventions in Mental Health 3 sem. hrs.
The design of the course focuses on the development of clinical skills of students in mental health counseling. Skill development includes theoretical conceptualizations, diagnosis, treatment planning, ethical considerations, and factors that enhance and impede the treatment process. Students will also clarify their theoretical orientation and implement techniques and interventions within the context of working with individuals from a variety of backgrounds. Other areas of emphasis include logistical concerns, consultation, referrals, and prevention programs and services.

582. Techniques of Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
The course is designed to be taken concurrently with EDPS 510, Theories of Counseling. Students discuss, observe and practice the various techniques derived from theories covered in EDPS 510. Contemporary counseling strategies and interventions are integrated into appropriate stages of the counseling process. Applications are made to a broad and diverse population of clients.

584. Group Procedures in Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
Skill development in the organization and facilitation of counseling groups is emphasized. Theoretical foundations, preparation for group, group dynamics, leader and member skills, and ethical and professional issues are examined. Experiential activities allow students to gain an understanding of the group counseling process and experience in leading groups.

585. Occupational Information and Occupational Choice Theory 3 sem. hrs.
This is an activity-oriented course emphasizing small-group participation in career and lifestyle considerations. Theories of career choice and career development and sources or occupational information are examined. Practice is provided in utilizing vocational assessment instruments and procedures. Career development programs and services are explored. The rationale of the course is to develop participants’ awareness of career choices and explore ways in which school systems can support this process.

586. Sex Counseling and Therapy 3 sem. hrs.
The course is designed for people who are, or are preparing to be, directly involved in counseling. It focuses on the special counseling skills and informational areas essential in helping counselees dealing with sexual problems. Particular approaches to sex therapy are discussed, along with methods used in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. There is extensive use of role-laying, group interaction and research data. Enrollment is limited. Prerequisites: EDPS 509 or its equivalent; EDPS 510, 582; and permission of the coordinator of the CD program.

587. Transpersonal Counseling 3 sem. hrs.
This process-oriented course surveys recent developments in transpersonal psychology as they relate to counseling. The emphasis is on holistic approaches to counseling that consider a variety of alternatives to self-understanding, behavioral change and working with conflicts in individuals or relationships. Participants read about current transpersonal theory and learn a variety of transpersonal counseling techniques experientially. The role of the counselor in facilitating personal growth and development is a central theme of the course.

589. Counseling Practicum 3 sem. hrs.
The student will spend a minimum of one full day in the field. Class time will be spent in the presentation of taped counseling sessions and discussion of field experiences. Class size must be limited to allow for thorough supervision of counseling tapes. Prerequisites: EDPS 510, 582 and permission of the coordinator of the CD program.

590. Advanced Counseling Practicum 3 sem. hrs.
The student will focus on discussing counseling sessions from the public schools, mental health agencies and higher education. Class time will be spent in reviewing counseling theories and techniques and in the demonstration of counseling sessions through audio tapes, video tapes or oral presentations. Class size must be limited to allow for thorough supervision of each counseling student. Prerequisites: EDPS 510, 582, 589 and permission of the coordinator of the CD Program.

591. Supervision of the Counseling Process 3 sem. hrs.
This is a course for advanced students in counseling who wish to develop skills in supervision of counselors. In addition to readings and discussions, each student will practice critiquing tape-recorded counseling sessions of other students. Each student will be expected to bring several tape recordings of counseling sessions to class for practice use. Prerequisite: Counseling practicum and permission of the coordinator of the CD program.

593. Internship in School Counseling 3-6 sem. hrs.
A supervised experience in area schools for candidates working toward permanent certification in school counseling. Specifically, the internship is designed to help the candidate improve interpersonal relationship skills, program development and managerial skills. Open only to advanced students working toward New York State permanent certification.

594. Mental Health Counseling Internship I 3 sem. hrs.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a clinical setting and allow for development of counseling skills and knowledge of the treatment process. While participating in a semester-long mental health counseling internship, students will learn to reflect upon their clinical experiences and professional-personal issues that develop in the treatment situation. Particular areas of focus include ethical and legal issues, supervision, working with diverse clients, logistical concerns and counselor self-care. The internship involves a 300-hour placement in a mental health setting, as well as a University class on a weekly basis.

595. Mental Health Counseling Internship II 3 sem. hrs.
Designed to be a continuation of Counseling Internship I, this course expands upon clinical skills, knowledge of the counseling setting, and ability to reflect upon personal and professional internship experiences. While demonstrating effective communication within the clinical setting, students will gain proficiency in client diagnosis and sound treatment planning. Specific areas of concern include counselor self-assessment, the clinical interview, psychological testing, the counseling process, psychotropic medications, professional challenges, ethical practice and consultation. The internship involves a 300-hour placement in a mental health setting, as well as a University class on a weekly basis.