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Animesh Giri '08 presents research to faculty and students

Animesh Giri '08, currently a Ph.D. candidate at Emory University, presented his research paper, "Refugee Immigrants' Earnings Assimilation: A Double Cohort Analysis" on Friday 22 February to economics faculty and students at St. Lawrence University.

Abstract:  This paper distinguishes between the earnings assimilation of refugees and non-refugee immigrants in the United States. Using the decennial census, years 1990 and 2000, I construct synthetic cohorts of immigrants based on their age and timing of entry into the US. Analyzing earnings of these cohorts within and across the two census periods, I find that relative to non-refugee immigrants, refugees in general earn higher wages as they age and with increasing duration in the US. Furthermore I find that immigrants’ age at entry into the country has important implications on their earnings assimilation rate. The youngest refugee cohort, within ten years of being in the country, has higher earnings than its U.S. native counterpart. The assimilation process takes twenty and thirty years for the middle and oldest cohorts of refugees respectively. Finally, even after thirty years none of the three non-refugee immigrant birth cohorts reach earning level equaling those of U.S. natives. 

Abstract:

" This paper distinguishes between the earnings assimilation of refugees and non-refugee immigrants in the United States. Using the decennial census, years 1990 and 2000, I construct synthetic cohorts of immigrants based on their age and timing of entry into the US. Analyzing earnings of these cohorts within and across the two census periods, I find that relative to non-refugee immigrants, refugees in general earn higher wages as they age and with increasing duration in the US. Furthermore I find that immigrants’ age at entry into the country has important implications on their earnings assimilation rate. The youngest refugee cohort, within ten years of being in the country, has higher earnings than its native counterpart. The assimilation process takes twenty and thirty years for the middle and oldest cohorts of refugees respectively. Finally, even after thirty years none of the three non-refugee immigrant birth cohorts reach earning level equaling those of natives. "