Science and Science-Related Issues

Faster, Stronger, Smarter: The Alchemy of Exceptional Human Performance

Instructor: 
Serge Onyper
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 10:10 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.

Alchemy is the process of transforming something common into something special. What would it take to transform an ordinary person into a human being capable of exceptional performance? How does genius come about? Since the times of Ancient Greeks and Romans, humans have tried to comprehend superior performance and capture genius – in art, literature, mathematics, philosophy, athletics, even war – and these attempts continue to be refined and redefined today by the modern advances in cognitive psychology, educational theory, pharmacology, and the study of artificial intelligence.

The Nature and Nurture of Health and Disease

Instructor: 
Jane Kring
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 12:00 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.

How do our genetic makeup (nature) and social influences (nurture) contribute to our happiness and health? What are the multiple causes of illnesses like diabetes and depression? How are they treated and why? This course will develop your understanding of illness and its biological and environmental contributing factors. Critical analysis and research skills will be practiced through readings and discussions on disease and well-being from a variety of sources and perspectives. We will also explore how to measure and enhance the happiness and health of others.

Spice, Sex and Science: History Through the Eyes of a Chemist

Instructor: 
Khanh Lam (Tina) Tao
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 10:10 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.

Why are peppers spicy? Did you know that the male and female sex hormones are almost identical in their chemical structures? What do TNT and sunscreen have in common? To answer these questions, we will take a look at the molecules that make up the everyday world. These molecules have shaped history, started wars, and made some great meals. In this seminar, we will also come to a better understanding of how much chemistry influences us and how to think scientifically about these interesting questions.

History Rebooted: Alan Turing and Understanding Artificial Intelligence

Instructor: 
Paul Doty
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 12:00 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.
Also Counts: 
This course also fulfills the HU general education requirement

Given that Alan Turing’s work breaking the German code was significant in defeating Nazi Germany in the Second World War, and given that you are likely reading this on a computer, Alan Turing is a part of your world. The course is an exploration of the life and work of Alan Turing and a course that will ask you to consider Turing’s best known legacy: the concept of artificial intelligence. We will consider who Turing was through biographical, fictional, and film versions of his life.

History of Ecology and Environmentalism

Instructor: 
Jessica Rogers
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 10:10 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.

In the life sciences there is always someone who was the first to describe the world we see around us. In a world of increasing environmentalism, everyone experiences ecology, but most people know very little about how or why we know the things we do about the world we live in. In a globally connected world, understanding how these discoveries influenced our modern environmentalism is crucial to becoming an ecologist.

Energy and the Environment

Instructor: 
George Repicky
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 10:10 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.
Also Counts: 
This course also fulfills the SS general education requirement

Is $4 gas here to stay? Should we still drill in the Alaskan wilderness after what we just saw happened in the Gulf of Mexico? What are the consequences of buying oil from OPEC? Why are there so many new wind farms in the North Country? Should we fund more nuclear plants or rely instead upon hydro-electric dams? Is there such a thing as “clean coal”? What about new technologies?

Scientific Reasoning and Communication

Instructor: 
Alexander Stewart
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 12:00 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.

For the first time in human history, we are living in a world immersed in scientific communication.  More and more information (in all media) is based on science—from natural and human disasters and climate to deciding on your first home and a bottled water of choice.  In order to be a well-informed citizen, you should be competent in critically and scientifically examining information (and disinformation) that is pouring through these media (e.g., radio, TV, internet).  In this seminar, we will develop your scientific reasoning and communications skills, which will ma

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