Current Social Issues

Speaking Like a Citizen

Instructor: 
Jessica Prody
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 10:10 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.
Also Counts: 
This course also counts as PCA 111 and fulfills the ARTS general education requirement

U.S. history has been shaped by those brave enough to use rhetoric in speech, writing, and protest to fight against social injustice. Through the semester students will explore the relationship between rhetoric and citizenship and learn to speak as citizens themselves. The course is, in part, historical, as we examine how rhetoric has shaped U.S. history and explore how differences in race, class, gender, and sexuality influence(d) how different movements use(d) rhetoric.

Sex, School, and Gender Roles

Instructor: 
Heidi Pitzer
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 10:10 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.
Also Counts: 
This course also counts as EDUC 203 and fulfills the SS general education requirement

Do school dress codes condone “slut-shaming”? How do school events like the prom maintain heteronormativity? What role does the “hidden curriculum” play in molding us into “good” (or “bad”) girls and boys? This course considers a range of contemporary issues in American education, investigated through the lenses of gender and sexuality. Using primarily sociological, feminist and critical theories, we will examine school as an institution that both reflects the gender/sex norms of broader society and reproduces these norms.

Doc Dynasty: Great Documentaries Past and Present

Instructor: 
Kara McLuckie
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 12:00 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.
Also Counts: 
This course also fulfills the HU general education requirement

What film won the first Oscar for Best Documentary? Which documentary author also pioneered film criticism? Do color photographs of the Great Depression exist? Where is the largest collection of American documentary photos and films housed?

Framing U.S. History

Instructor: 
Mary Jane Smith
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 10:10 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Also Counts: 
This course also fulfills the HU general education requirement

From Birth of a Nation (1915) to They Died With Their Boots On (1941) to Born on the Fourth of July (1989) to Argo (2012) and beyond, film has helped to shape how Americans think about major events in our past. This FYS will focus on how film has represented and/or misrepresented pivotal moments and issues in American history. The course will be organized on a loose chronological basis, beginning with silent film and moving through more contemporary films. However, the course will not be a history of U.S.

Know Your Rights: Constitutional Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

Instructor: 
Diane J. Exoo
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 10:10-11:40 a.m. and Wednesday 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Also Counts: 
This course also fulfills the SS general education requirement

This course examines the history of the U.S. Supreme Court and its role as the interpreter of our fundamental rights.  What provisions of the U.S.

Performing Diversity

Instructor: 
Rebecca Daniels
Meeting Days/Times: 
Tuesday and Thursday 12:00-2:10 p.m.
Also Counts: 
This course also counts as PCA 106 and fulfills the DIV13 and ARTS requirements

Using research, creative writing, and personal experiences, this seminar will explore various issues of multiculturalism and diversity on the St. Lawrence campus and in America today. We will engage a variety of texts to investigate the links between identity and oppression by race, class, gender, sexual orientation, differing abilities, and religion.

America’s Suburban Landscape

Instructor: 
Matt McCluskey
Meeting Days/Times: 
Meeting Days/Times: Tuesday 10:10 a.m.-1:10 p.m. and Thursday 10:10-11:40 a.m.
Also Counts: 
This course also fulfills the SS general education requirement

Why has America consistently pursued a pro-suburban development policy and what are the consequences of this societal preference?   Scholars from such diverse fields as economics, environmental studies, demography, sociology, engineering, government, and ethnography regularly wrestle with these critical questions, and they will drive our work throughout the semester. Of particular interest to our class is the impact that suburban bias has had on America’s transportation systems, popular culture, housing supply, economic balance, and environmental health.

Syndicate content