Studio Art Pages

Studio Courses

All studio courses are one-unit courses and meet five hours per week. Students interested in an Art and Art History major should plan to take AAH131 Drawing I, the pre-requisite for upper-level studio art courses, as soon as possible.

121.     Introduction to Studio Art.

An introductory course that raises fundamental questions about the nature of artistic activity. Students should expect to be engaged in both the process of making art and discussion related to the theoretical basis of such activity. Open to all undergraduates, this course is designed specifically for non-majors.  Offered every semester.  Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

131.     Drawing I.

This course is the prerequisite for all upper level studio art courses.  Potential majors and minors should take Drawing I as early as possible in their academic careers. The emphasis is on the development of perceptual, compositional, and critical drawing skills. Direct observation of still-life and figurative subjects lead to more abstract modes of expression. Various media are used. Offered every semester.  Registration limited.

232.     Drawing II.

This course continues to emphasize developing observational skills but focuses more on conceptual issues and ideas of expression. Various media are used. Prerequisites: AAH 131. Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

228.     Color  

This course explores the interaction of color through the classic exercises of Josef Albers. Using color aid paper and paint, students will work through versions of Albers projects that explore the highly relative nature of color. A wide range of the unpredictable and elusive properties of color will be examined and manipulated. Students will develop a keen understanding of the function of color in art and design and sharpen their ability to perceive color relationships. The course will also examine ideas about color through artists’ writings and by studying color-related exhibitions. Students will look at contemporary approaches to using color alongside of Albers’ established ideas. Prerequisites: AAH 131. Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

229.     Painting I.       

The emphasis is on developing an understanding of pictorial space in painting and use of basic elements such as color, value, form, composition and surface. Through structured projects, students learn fundamental painting techniques, make the transition from drawing into painting, and understand the process of visual perception. Presentations of historical and contemporary artists complement the studio practice. Students are expected to invest significant work time outside of class, attend exhibitions, actively participate in discussions and critiques, and devise and execute their own final project. Prerequisites: AAH 131. Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

230.     Painting II.     

Students continue to develop their understanding of the elements of painting while engaging a more complex set of problems and concepts. Studio practice is contextualized through discussions on issues in aesthetics, art historical antecedents and contemporary approaches to art. Requirements include a presentation on an artist, reading scholarly essays and artists’ writings, response papers, exhibitions reviews, participation in discussions and critiques, and a visual journal. Students are expected to invest significant work outside the class. Prerequisites: AAH 131, 229. Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

235.     Abstract Drawing: Uli and Other Forms.

The principal objective of this course is to expose students to some abstract drawing traditions of the world and, through studio practices structured around these traditions, enable students to explore the potential of abstract drawing as a viable and independent means of expression. Using the Uli drawing/painting tradition of Nigeria as a point of departure, the course covers European calligraphy; Chinese, Japanese and Arabic calligraphy and painting; and the graphic works of modern artists like Paul Klee, Joan Miro, Ben Shahn, Ibrahim el Salahi and Uche Okeke. Prerequisite: AAH 131. Fulfills the diversity distribution credit.  Also offered through African Studies and Global Studies. 

239.     Sculpture and Extended Media I.

This is a course for expressing one’s ideas in three dimensions and through a variety of media. Students receive an introduction to the basic techniques, materials and terminology of 3D design, sculpture and contemporary art in general. Assignments in modeling, mixed media, installation and collaboration are included. Materials include clay, plaster, wood and metal as well as found, mixed and experimental media. In order to give students a broader perspective on contemporary cultural production and thought, the course includes investigation of historical and theoretical aspects of contemporary art. Brainstorming and critique are common, and will follow the Harkness Method of student-centered discussion and inquiry to help students learn to think critically, listen analytically, and interact respectfully.  Prerequisite: AAH 131. Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

240.     Sculpture and Extended Media II.

A continuation of AAH 239. Students are expected to expand their ideas into more fully resolved and conceptually challenging works. Collaboration, casting, fabrication/building techniques using wood and metal, investigation of tactical media approaches and other materials as determined by the student’s interest and conceptual direction. Brainstorming and critique are common, and will follow the Harkness Method of student-centered discussion and inquiry to help students learn to think critically, listen analytically, and interact respectfully. Depending upon student interest and experience, this course may be offered in conjunction with AAH 239 by permission only.  Prerequisites: AAH 131, 239.  Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

241.     Printmaking I.

An introduction to relief and intaglio processes, this course involves drawing, processing, proofing, and editioning prints. Students are also exposed to historical and contemporary ideas and images related to making prints. Prerequisite: AAH 131.  Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

247, 248, and 347, 348.  Special Topics in Art.

Topics relate to the history, practice or theory of art. Depending upon the topic, prerequisites may be required. Specific topics are announced in the Class Schedule each semester.

249.     Ceramics I.
A course for expressing one’s ideas through the most basic and malleable material – clay. Students learn a wide range of contemporary practices used by ceramic artists and designers working today, how to find their own creative voices, and how to analyze ceramic works of art from their own positionalities. Processes covered include: traditional hand-building techniques include: pinch, slab, coil, solid and hollow modeling as well as wheel throwing and creating multiples through mold-making and slip and press-casting. While a wide range of processes is introduced, the emphasis of this course will remain on the ideas communicated through the forms that students create. The course also investigates the historical and theoretical aspects of contemporary ceramic vessels, sculpture and decorative works as well as the shifting concepts of “fine art” v. “craft”. Brainstorming and critique are common, and will follow the Harkness Method of student-centered discussion and inquiry to help students learn to think critically, listen analytically, and interact respectfully.  Depending upon student interest and experience, this course may be taken as AAH 250 by instructor permission only. Prerequisite: AAH 131.  Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

250.     Ceramics II.

A continuation of Ceramics I.  Students are expected to expand their ideas into more fully resolved and conceptually challenging works. Fabrication/building techniques such as press molding, slip casting, installation work and mixing media are discussed. More advanced surfacing techniques such as ceramic decals, printing on clay, experimental finishes and glaze chemistry are explored. Brainstorming and critique are common, and will follow the Harkness Method of student-centered discussion and inquiry to help students learn to think critically, listen analytically, and interact respectfully.  Depending upon student interest and experience, this course may be offered in conjunction with AAH 249 by instructor permission only. Prerequisites: AAH 131, 249.  Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

259.  Photography I.

Photo I is an introduction to the theory, techniques and process of black and white film photography. This course will emphasize photography’s potential for creative problem solving and self-expression in an art context. This class will consist of slide lectures, presentations, and screenings featuring contemporary artists, camera and lighting demonstrations, in-class exercises, discussions and most importantly, critiques of your work. Students are expected to provide their own SLR camera. Prerequisite: AAH 131. Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

260.     Photography II.

Photo II delves into the theory, techniques and processes of digital photography. This class will consist of readings, presentations, and screenings featuring contemporary artists, technical demonstrations, in-class exercises, discussions and most importantly, critiques of your work. Students are expected to provide their own Digital SLR camera. Prerequisites: AAH 131, 259. Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

269.     Digital Media and Culture I.

A combination studio/seminar that explores the major theoretical issues surrounding the continually evolving culture of digital technology and the effects on various aspects of contemporary life including: aesthetics and perception, creative production, morality, contemporary art discourse, visual culture, entertainment, identity and other forms of social effects/affects.  Studio projects will investigate the creative potentials of social media software, digital painting, photography, and video.  Projects will respond conceptually to theoretical issues that are being discussed in class. An emphasis on individual voice, creativity, and methods of idea development will be encouraged throughout the term. Brainstorming and critique are common, and will follow the Harkness Method of student-centered discussion and inquiry to help students learn to think critically, listen analytically, and interact respectfully.  Depending upon student interest and experience, this course may be taken as AAH 369 by instructor permission only.  Prerequisites:  AAH 131.  Also offered as FILM 269.  Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

270.     Collaboration Across the Arts.

The direction of this course is determined largely by the unique combination of students who participate. Students form groups of two or three to work on a collaborative project of their own design reflecting their collective interests. For example, a pair of students may create a multimedia work that draws connections between image and sound. Students critique works in progress, study exemplary works, discuss relevant aesthetic issues, trace connections across media and consider strategies for collaborative work. Offered every year. Prerequisite: AAH 131 and permission of the instructor. Also offered as Music 270 and Performance and Communication Arts 270. 

329.     Painting III/IV.

The primary aim is to examine painting in the 21st century through both theory and practice. The course investigates painting’s historical antecedents as well as contemporary trends and currents. Students develop a coherent body of paintings that explores an individual direction and demonstrates knowledge of contemporary influences and historical precedents. Lectures, discussions, critiques and occasional visits to museums/galleries complement studio production. Students are required to do weekly readings and exhibition reviews, maintain a research journal and give an artist lecture at the end of the term. Prerequisites: AAH 131, 229, 230. Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

341.     Printmaking II.

A continuation of Printmaking I, with the introduction of lithography, screenprinting, and other processes. Further emphasis is given to thematic development in one’s work. Study of contemporary printmakers and more specialized print techniques are pursued.  Prerequisite: AAH 131, 241. Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

360.     Photography III.

Prerequisites:  AAH 131, 259, 260.  Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

 

369.     Digital Media and Culture II.

A continuation of Digital Media and Culture I.  New and more complex software will be introduced.  Students will be expected to spend time developing innovative and complex ideas and forms and advancing their vision(s) via digital media processes. This is a combination studio/seminar course and includes videos, readings and reflections, and written analyses. New visions of authorship will be encouraged as will continual encouragement to consider how one’s work could function in a socially transformative way.  Brainstorming and critique are common, and will follow the Harkness Method of student-centered discussion and inquiry to help students learn to think critically, listen analytically, and interact respectfully.  Depending upon student interest and experience, this course may be offered in conjunction with AAH 269 by instructor permission only. Prerequisites: AAH 131, 269.  Registration limited.  Fulfills the ART distribution requirement.

389, 390.              Special Projects in Art I and II.

Individual study for studio majors or especially qualified students. Prerequisite: consent of the supervising professor and department chair.  Written proposals are required the semester before intended project.  Hours to be arranged.

460.     SYE:   Senior Seminar in Visual Arts.

This course is required of all Art and Art History majors pursuing a concentration in studio art.  This course is designed to provide a basis for continuing one’s creativity in a professional and effective manner following graduation. Additionally, it is intended to give students a greater understanding of exhibition/gallery practices and to enlighten the student in the areas of independent art production: specifically the professional and personal challenges/rewards that lie therein. This course is comprised of readings, written assignments, studio work, and an exhibition. Offered every spring semester. 

489, 490.     SYE: Independent Study.

An independent study for senior studio majors that builds upon the student’s prior work in studio art and is directed toward developing superior skills in research and studio work. A public presentation of the semester’s work is required.  Prerequisites: permission of the overseeing instructor and the department. Written proposals are required and are due the semester before intended project, one week prior to registration.

495, 496.     Senior Project:  Honors in Art and Art History.

Details of the program are available from the department chair. Honors Projects are yearlong projects that emphasize independent work and superior achievement.  Students interested in pursuing an honors project should consult with their advisor and with the chair of the department early in their junior year to begin to formulate a proposal.  A public exhibition of the year’s work, as well as a defense of the work before departmental faculty, is required. Prerequisite: a minimum GPA of 3.5 in all courses in the major.  Proposals must be submitted spring semester of the junior year, one week prior to registration.  Permission of the department is needed.